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  • Mutational and phenotypic analysis of hyperphenylalaninaemia in Southern Ireland 

    O'Donnell, Kate (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2000)
    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is the most common inherited defect of amino acid metabolism in the Irish population occurring at a frequency of 1/4,500 live births. It is caused by a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme Phenylalanine ...
  • Differential patterns of gene expression associated with microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability in colorectal cancer 

    Dunican, Donncha St. John (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2000)
    Two distinct pathways exist in sporadic colorectal cancer. The microsatellite instability pathway (MIN) is recognised by widespread instability caused by aberrant mismatch repair machinery. This genotype accounts for 15% ...
  • Differential patterns of gene expression associated with metastasis in colon cancer 

    Parle-McDermott, Anne (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2000)
    Metastatic spread is the main cause of colon cancer related death and therefore a greater understanding of this process is a prerequisite for improved treatment. The acquisition of metastatic properties confers tumour cells ...
  • Computational approaches to the display and manipulation of metabolic pathways : theory and practice 

    Connolly, James Joseph (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2008)
    Since metabolic pathways constitute a complex system, a mathematical description, even a structural one, must be simplified. Yet, the model must be sufficiently general so that it will encompass the system that is to be ...
  • Metabolic control analysis and mitochondrial function in the nerve terminal 

    Telford, Jayne E. (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2009)
    Reduced activities of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and ...
  • In vitro and in vivo studies on the neuropeptide thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) 

    Cullen, Aoife (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2009)
    Thyrotropin-releasing hornnone (pyroglutamyl-histidyl-prolineamide; TRH), a tripeptide, a hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormone, has neuromodulatory properties and is found in the brain in locations where it has no ...
  • Nerve terminal bioenergetics and control of neurotransmitter release 

    Kilbride, Seán (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2009)
    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to develop as part of the aging process and has been implicated in chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ...
  • Serotonin transporter ligands as anticancer agents : investigations into a mechanism-based therapy for Burkitt's lymphoma and related malignancies 

    Cloonan, Suzanne M. (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2009)
    The recent discovery that some serotonin transporter (SERT) ligands have the potential to act as pro-apoptotic agents in Burkitt’s lymphoma adds greatly to their diverse pharmacological application and is the primary focus ...
  • Evolution of human Natural Killer cell receptors 

    Guinan, Kieran (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2009)
    Natural Killer (NK) cells are key components of the innate immune system which function in identifying and destroying aberrant or infected cells. They also play active roles in human reproduction. These functions are largely ...
  • Modulation of T cell responses by manipulating signalling pathways in dendritic cells 

    Brereton, Corinna (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2009)
    Heat labile enterotoxin from E. Coli (LT) is a powerful vaccine adjuvant, capable of enhancing Th1 and Th2 responses to co-administered antigens. The present study demonstrates that LT also promotes the induction of Th17 ...
  • Regulatory T cell induction and function 

    Walsh, Kevin (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2009)
    The main objective of this study was to examine novel methods of inducing regulatory T (Treg) cells by modulating dendritic cell (DC) activation. It has previously been reported that TLR agonists stimulate IL-12 production ...
  • The role of T cells in the pathogenesis and prevention of the inflammatory and neurodegenerative changes associated with Alzheimer's disease 

    McQuillan, Keith (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2009)
    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is characterised by deposition of amyloid-beta (Aβ)-containing plaques and also by neuroinflammatory changes, typified by an increase in proinflammatory cytokine ...
  • T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis 

    Lalor, Stephen (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2010)
    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an intlammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that is both clinically and pathologically heterogeneous. Studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), ...
  • Investigation of the mechanism of action and the therapeutic potential of peptides derived from the vaccinia virus protein A46 

    Lysakova-Devine, Tatyana (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2010)
    The innate arm of the mammalian immune system employs a number of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognise pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate ...
  • Immune regulation by interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis 

    Sweeney, Cheryl (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2010)
    Interferon (IFN)-β is a commonly used therapy for patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Although IFN-β has been shown to exert various immunomodulatory effects, the therapeutic mechanisms are still ...
  • Manipulating regulatory responses in antitumour immunity 

    Galvin, Karen (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2011)
    The immune system has evolved tolerogenic and regulatory mechanism to control responses to self-antigens and to ensure that the inflammatory immune response to pathogens does not cause excessive tissue damage during ...
  • Derivation of dopaminergic neurons from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells 

    Williams, Emma (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2011)
    Dopamine (DA) neurons have several fundamental functions in the brain, dysfunction of which has been implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD) and schizophrenia. Embryonic ...
  • HCV evasion of IFN-alpha signalling : implications for therapy 

    Bourke, Nollaig (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2012)
    Successful anti-viral immunity is dependent on effective activation of the innate immune response. The majority of individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) fail to eliminate the virus and progress to chronic ...
  • Bioenergetics and mitochondrial dynamics in cancer cells and neurons 

    Quinn, Stephen (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2012)
    Mitochondria in mammalian cells exist as a highly dynamic and interconnected reticulum. This reticular ultrastructure is defined by the opposing forces of fission and fusion, mainly mediated by a group of large GTPases ...
  • Immunotherapeutics & vaccine adjuvants for cancer 

    Corcoran, Anna-Maria B. (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2013)
    It is well established that innate immune responses not only mediate immunity to infection, but also promotes adaptive immunity to pathogens and tumours. Dendritic cells (DC) play a critical role as antigen presenting cells ...