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  • A role for eIF4A1 in IL-10 induction by LPS 

    Alam, M. Mustafa (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2014)
    microRNAs are a family of short non-coding RNAs that act as fine tuners of gene expression by controlling mRNAs. They have been implicated in numerous diseases including inflammatory diseases. A number of studies have ...
  • Activation and function of mucosal gamma delta T cells 

    Misiak, Alicja (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2015)
    γδ T cells are innate-like lymphocytes characterised by rapid activation following infection or tissue injury. They are enriched in the skin and epitheliae of various organs, where breach of the barrier is likely to occur. ...
  • An integrated approach to oral vaccination against enteric pathogens 

    Davitt, Christopher (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2014)
    While the majority of human pathogens infect the body through mucosal sites, most licenced vaccines are injectable. In fact the only mucosal vaccine that is widely used for infant and childhood vaccination programs is the ...
  • An investigaton of the innate immune response to the vaccine adjuvant chitosan 

    Carroll, Elizabeth (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2015)
    Vaccination is widely regarded as one of the most successful medical intervention strategies to have been introduced. Despite its resounding success, significant challenges in the field of vaccine research still remain. ...
  • Analysis of mitochondrial proteomes and supercomplex structures in brain tissue 

    Brady, Laura (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2015)
    Mitochondria play a complex multifactorial role in the control of cell bioenergetics. A primary function of mitochondria is the production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) by the process of oxidative phosphorylation that ...
  • Bioenergetics and mitochondrial dynamics in cancer cells and neurons 

    Quinn, Stephen (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2012)
    Mitochondria in mammalian cells exist as a highly dynamic and interconnected reticulum. This reticular ultrastructure is defined by the opposing forces of fission and fusion, mainly mediated by a group of large GTPases ...
  • Characterisation of T cell responses during Staphylococcus aureus infection 

    Murphy, Alison (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2014)
    The development of anti-S. aureus vaccines has consistently failed in clinical trials, likely due to inefficient induction of cellular immunity. A comprehensive understanding of the discrete T cell subsets critical for ...
  • Computational approaches to the display and manipulation of metabolic pathways : theory and practice 

    Connolly, James Joseph (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2008)
    Since metabolic pathways constitute a complex system, a mathematical description, even a structural one, must be simplified. Yet, the model must be sufficiently general so that it will encompass the system that is to be ...
  • Cytidine Aminohydrolase 

    Smyth, Maurice Joseph
    The object of this work was to gain some information about the mechanics of action of cytidine aminohydralase from sheep liver
  • Derivation of dopaminergic neurons from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells 

    Williams, Emma (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2011)
    Dopamine (DA) neurons have several fundamental functions in the brain, dysfunction of which has been implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD) and schizophrenia. Embryonic ...
  • DHX9 : novel roles in cytokine induction and its antagonism by vaccinia virus protein E3 

    Dempsey, Alan (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2015)
    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a dsDNA virus, which replicates in the cytoplasm of infected host cells. VACV, similar to other viruses, is detected by host innate immunity mainly by sensing of viral nucleic acids such as dsRNA, ...
  • Differential patterns of gene expression associated with metastasis in colon cancer 

    Parle-McDermott, Anne (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2000)
    Metastatic spread is the main cause of colon cancer related death and therefore a greater understanding of this process is a prerequisite for improved treatment. The acquisition of metastatic properties confers tumour cells ...
  • Differential patterns of gene expression associated with microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability in colorectal cancer 

    Dunican, Donncha St. John (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2000)
    Two distinct pathways exist in sporadic colorectal cancer. The microsatellite instability pathway (MIN) is recognised by widespread instability caused by aberrant mismatch repair machinery. This genotype accounts for 15% ...
  • The Effects of Low-Dose Methotrexate on Metabolism in Primary Human PBMCs 

    O'FARRELL, LAURA (Trinity College Dublin. School of Biochemistry & Immunology. Discipline of Biochemistry, 2017)
    Low-dose Methotrexate (MTX) is a powerful anti-arthritic drug used in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases. It is an economical drug and is easily administered, but incomplete knowledge into its mechanism ...
  • Evaluation of the anti-cancer effects of novel pyrrolo-1, 5-benzoxazepines in neuroblastoma 

    Lennon, Jennifer (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2015)
    Neuroblastoma, a malignancy of neuroectodermal origin, accounts for 15% of childhood cancer deaths. Despite both advances in understanding the biology of the cancer and aggressive treatment strategies, it continues to be ...
  • Evolution of human Natural Killer cell receptors 

    Guinan, Kieran (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2009)
    Natural Killer (NK) cells are key components of the innate immune system which function in identifying and destroying aberrant or infected cells. They also play active roles in human reproduction. These functions are largely ...
  • Genetic variation in bulls divergent for fertility 

    WHISTON, RONAN (Trinity College Dublin. School of Biochemistry & Immunology. Discipline of Biochemistry, 2017)
    Bovine fertility remains a critical issue underpinning the sustainability of the agricultural sector. Since the realisation of an unfavourable relationship between fertility and production traits in cattle, methods to ...
  • HCV evasion of IFN-alpha signalling : implications for therapy 

    Bourke, Nollaig (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2012)
    Successful anti-viral immunity is dependent on effective activation of the innate immune response. The majority of individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) fail to eliminate the virus and progress to chronic ...
  • Immune regulation by interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis 

    Sweeney, Cheryl (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). School of Biochemistry and Immunology, 2010)
    Interferon (IFN)-β is a commonly used therapy for patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Although IFN-β has been shown to exert various immunomodulatory effects, the therapeutic mechanisms are still ...
  • An immunomodulatory role for indole-3-pyruvate, an excreted metabolite of the parasite Trypanosoma Brucei 

    CORCORAN, SARAH ELIZABETH (Trinity College Dublin. School of Biochemistry & Immunology. Discipline of Biochemistry, 2017)
    Human African trypanosomiasis, more commonly known as sleeping sickness, is one of the world's neglected diseases. Trypanosoma brucei, an extracellular parasitic protozoan of the genus Trypanosoma, is the causative agent. ...