Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Susanen
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-30T15:28:33Z
dc.date.available2021-06-30T15:28:33Z
dc.date.issued2021en
dc.date.submitted2021en
dc.identifier.citationSusan Flynn and Tom Wengraf, Devices for illuminating defended subjectivities in complex qualitative case interpretation: An example from recent BNIM practice, Journal of Psychosocial Studies, 14, 2, 2021, 105 - 119en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/96631
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractFor a long time now, fairly central to what has emerged as ‘psychosocial studies’ has been the notion of psychosocietal ‘defendedness’. This is the psychoanalytic notion that people (not excluding social science researchers) must be understood in general as being ‘defended subjectivities’. This immediately raises the question of the ‘defended researcher’ being sensitive to – and having procedures for detecting and interpreting the working of – such ‘defensiveness’ in the interactions of their subjects and themselves. Biography-based research raises these issues particularly strongly. One such method, known as the ‘biographical narrative interpretative method’ (BNIM) of interviewing and case interpretation, has been used in the anglophone world for more than 20 years. While BNIM prescribes an audit trail for its interpretative practices, it is rare to discover a fully audited sequence of components, and rarer still to have access to illuminating free-associative fieldnotes that catalogue the researcher’s evolving subjectivity. This article discusses defendedness in a case interpretation within a BNIM-using PhD. We conclude that, to defeat the defensiveness of both researcher and peer-auditor (the co-authors of this article), several BNIM techniques need to be used systematically and that, in particular, a ‘private and confidential’ independent peer audit is valuable under certain conditions, and should be provided for in any research proposal. Through peer audit, the researcher can be (usually uncomfortably) sensitised to new possibilities about their otherwise inadequately understood defended processes and conclusions.en
dc.format.extent105en
dc.format.extent119en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Psychosocial Studiesen
dc.relation.ispartofseries14en
dc.relation.ispartofseries2en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectbiographical narrative interpretative methoden
dc.subjectdefended researcheren
dc.subjectpeer auditen
dc.subjectpsychosocietalen
dc.subjectsubjectivityen
dc.titleDevices for illuminating defended subjectivities in complex qualitative case interpretation: An example from recent BNIM practiceen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/sflynn7en
dc.identifier.rssinternalid231820en
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1332/147867321X16218659135374
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0002-2807-0866en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record