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dc.contributor.advisorKallen, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorWalsh-Brennan, Irene P.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-30T12:40:36Z
dc.date.available2017-05-30T12:40:36Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationIrene P. Walsh-Brennan, 'Speak to me...speak to me please : Conversational sociability: an emergent ability amidst perceived disability in chronic schizophrenia', [thesis], Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). Department of Clinical Speech & Language Studies, 2002, pp 399, pp 125
dc.identifier.otherTHESIS 7072.1
dc.identifier.otherTHESIS 7072.2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/80264
dc.description.abstractAn analysis of the conversational interactions of people with chronic schizophrenia, to expose an ability where heretofore disability has been described, is the focus of this thesis. Conversation is one aspect of communication and is, by definition, a dynamic, two-way interaction between interlocutors. A focus on naturally occurring conversational interactions allows language-in-use to be explored, as this is viewed as the most difficult domain of verbal expression for people with schizophrenia (C. Frith, 1992, 1997). Schizophrenia is a poorly understood psychiatric illness. Almost a century after it was first described, debate continues as to its existence, nature and cause (see Bentall, 1990; Boyle, 1990). Misunderstandings of the illness also permeate the public's attitude to the disorder. Schizophrenia is generally viewed in a negative light, with the standard paradigm of 'disability' pervading discussions of the disorder. Concepts of disability also infiltrate the literature on communication and schizophrenia, where the person with schizophrenia is viewed as the one with a communication disability and consequently responsible for conversational breakdown when it occurs.
dc.format2 volumes
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTrinity College (Dublin, Ireland). Department of Clinical Speech & Language Studies
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://stella.catalogue.tcd.ie/iii/encore/record/C__Rb12429645
dc.subjectClinical Speech and Language Studies, Ph.D.
dc.subjectPh.D. Trinity College Dublin
dc.titleSpeak to me...speak to me please : Conversational sociability: an emergent ability amidst perceived disability in chronic schizophrenia
dc.typethesis
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertations
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publications
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.format.extentpaginationpp 399
dc.format.extentpaginationpp 125
dc.description.noteTARA (Trinity’s Access to Research Archive) has a robust takedown policy. Please contact us if you have any concerns: rssadmin@tcd.ie
dc.description.notePrint thesis water damaged as a result of the Berkeley Library Podium flood 25/10/2011


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