Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVOGEL, CARLen
dc.contributor.editorAnna Esposito, Antonietta M. Esposito, Alessandro Vinciarelli, Rüdiger Hoffmann, Vincent C. Mülleren
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T10:36:00Z
dc.date.available2013-08-20T10:36:00Z
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.date.submitted2012en
dc.identifier.citationMeasuring Synchrony in Dialog Transcripts, Anna Esposito, Antonietta M. Esposito, Alessandro Vinciarelli, Rüdiger Hoffmann, Vincent C. Müller , Cognitive Behavioural Systems, Springer, 2012, 73 - 88, Carl Vogel and Lydia Behanen
dc.identifier.issn978-3-642-34583-8en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/67167
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.descriptionCOST 2102 International Training School, Dresden, Germany, February 21-26, 2011, Revised Selected Papersen
dc.description.abstractA finite register method of processing dialog transcripts is used to measure interlocutor synchrony. Successive contributions by participants are measured for word n-gram repetitions and temporal overlaps. The Zipfian distribution of words in language use leads to a natural expectation that random re-orderings of dialog contributions will unavoidably exhibit repetition -- one might reasonably expect that the frequency of repetition in actual dialog is in fact best explained as a random effect. Accordingly, significance is assessed with respect to randomized contrast values. The contrasts are obtained from averages over randomized reorderings of dialog contributions with temporal spans of the revised dialogs guided by the original durations. Benchmark distributions for allo-repetition and self-repetition are established from existing dialog transcripts covering a pair of pragmatically different circumstances: ATR English language ``lingua franca'' discussions, Air-Traffic communications (Flight 1549 over the Hudson River). Repetition in actual dialog exceeds the frequency one might expect from a random process. Perhaps surprisingly from the perspective of using repetition as an index of synchrony, self-repetition significantly exceeds allo-repetition.en
dc.format.extent73en
dc.format.extent88en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectcomputational linguisticsen
dc.subjectdialogen
dc.subjectsynchronyen
dc.subjectinteraction analysisen
dc.subjectconversation analysisen
dc.titleMeasuring Synchrony in Dialog Transcriptsen
dc.title.alternativeCognitive Behavioural Systemsen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/vogelen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid81934en
dc.identifier.doidx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-34584-5en
dc.subject.TCDThemeDigital Humanitiesen
dc.subject.TCDThemeIntelligent Content & Communicationsen
dc.subject.TCDThemeNext Generation Medical Devicesen
dc.subject.TCDTagComputational linguisticsen
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://www.springerlink.com/content/978-3-642-34583-8/#section=1166358&page=1&locus=3en
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000--000-8928-8546en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record