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dc.contributor.authorSAUNDERS, MATTHEWen
dc.contributor.authorJONES, MICHAELen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-01T15:10:24Z
dc.date.available2011-07-01T15:10:24Z
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.date.submitted2011en
dc.identifier.citationKindler, Reimo; Siemens, Jan; Kaiser, Klaus; Walmsley, David C.; Bernhofer, Christian; Buchmann, Nina; Cellier, Pierre; Eugster, Werner; Gleixner, Gerd; Grunwald, Thomas; Heim, Alexander; Ibrom, Andreas; Jones, Stephanie K.; Jones, Mike; Klumpp, Katja; Kutsch, Werner; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Lehuger, Simon; Loubet, Benjamin; McKenzie, Rebecca; Moors, Eddy; Osborne, Bruce; Pilegaard, Kim; Rebmann, Corinna; Saunders, Matthew; Schmidt, Michael W.I.; Schrumpf, Marion; Seyfferth, Janine; Skiba, Ute; Soussana, Jean-Francois; Sutton, Mark A.; Tefs, Cindy; Vowinckel, Bernhard; Zeeman, Matthias J.; Kaupenjohann, Martin, Dissolved carbon leaching from soil is a crucial component of the net ecosystem carbon balance, Global Change Biology, 17, 2, 2011, 1167-1185en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/57383
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractEstimates of carbon leaching losses from different land use systems are few and their contribution to the net ecosystem carbon balance is uncertain. We investigated leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and dissolved methane (CH4), at forests, grasslands, and croplands across Europe. Biogenic contributions to DIC were estimated by means of its ?13C signature. Leaching of biogenic DIC was 8.3?4.9 g m?2 yr?1 for forests, 24.1?7.2 g m?2 yr?1 for grasslands, and 14.6?4.8 g m?2 yr?1 for croplands. DOC leaching equalled 3.5?1.3 g m?2 yr?1 for forests, 5.3?2.0 g m?2 yr?1 for grasslands, and 4.1?1.3 g m?2 yr?1 for croplands. The average flux of total biogenic carbon across land use systems was 19.4?4.0 g C m?2 yr?1. Production of DOC in topsoils was positively related to their C/N ratio and DOC retention in subsoils was inversely related to the ratio of organic carbon to iron plus aluminium (hydr)oxides. Partial pressures of CO2 in soil air and soil pH determined DIC concentrations and fluxes, but soil solutions were often supersaturated with DIC relative to soil air CO2. Leaching losses of biogenic carbon (DOC plus biogenic DIC) from grasslands equalled 5?98% (median: 22%) of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) plus carbon inputs with fertilization minus carbon removal with harvest. Carbon leaching increased the net losses from cropland soils by 24?105% (median: 25%). For the majority of forest sites, leaching hardly affected actual net ecosystem carbon balances because of the small solubility of CO2 in acidic forest soil solutions and large NEE. Leaching of CH4 proved to be insignificant compared with other fluxes of carbon. Overall, our results show that leaching losses are particularly important for the carbon balance of agricultural systems.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was funded by the German Research Foundation (Grants SI 1106/2-1, KA 1673/7-1) and supported by the CarboEurope and NitroEurope integrated projects and the Infrastructure for Measurements of the European Carbon Cycle (IMECC) program of the European Union. David Walmsley acknowledges funding by the Environmental Protection Agency of Ireland. Claire Campbell, Jan Elbers, Wilma Jans, Ottmar Joos, Patricia Laville, Celline Belleau, Eric Larmanou, and Gary Lanigan supported the instrumentation of research sites and sampling of soil water and air. We acknowledge the help of Claudia Kuntz, who analysed most of the samples at the Chair of Soil Science, Berlin University of Technology. Additional analyses were carried out by Christine Krenkewitz, Soil Sciences, Martin Luther University Halle. We thank Willi Brand for analysing DIC stable isotopes at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena, and the Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry at Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research UFZ, Leipzig, for the analysis of soil air samples. We are grateful to Kristina Roth for providing soil data of the Fruebuel site.en
dc.format.extent1167-1185en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGlobal Change Biologyen
dc.relation.ispartofseries17en
dc.relation.ispartofseries2en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectBotanyen
dc.subjectcarbon balanceen
dc.titleDissolved carbon leaching from soil is a crucial component of the net ecosystem carbon balanceen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/jonesmen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/saundemen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid73878en
dc.subject.TCDThemeSmart & Sustainable Planeten
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02282.xen


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