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dc.contributor.advisorHennessy, Marken
dc.contributor.authorHINGST, MARIE SOPHIEen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-20T12:13:36Z
dc.date.available2018-08-20T12:13:36Z
dc.date.issued2018en
dc.date.submitted2018en
dc.identifier.citationHINGST, MARIE SOPHIE, One phenomenon, Three perspectives. English colonial strategies in Ireland revisited, 1603-1680, Trinity College Dublin.School of Histories & Humanities.HISTORY, 2018en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/83834
dc.descriptionAPPROVEDen
dc.description.abstractRecent years have seen renewed scholarly interest in Ireland s position within the English colonial system during the early modern period. With regard to developments in the seventeenth century, however, the long-established narrative has identified ruptures, changes and political turmoil as the key characteristic of this period. Consequently, the question of continuities within English colonial strategies between 1603 and 1680 has not evoked much interest. This thesis wants to overcome this approach by exploring the way in which colonial policies shaped the nature of English colonialism in Ireland, while at the same time focusing on the development of long-term patterns. The completion of the Tudor conquest of Ireland in 1603 provided new momentum to the English colonial endeavour. In exploring the congruencies of renewed efforts to implement reliable governmental structures, this thesis has chosen three protagonists whose careers in Ireland offer insights into both individual strategies and continuous patterns. Examining the role of John Davies, Thomas Wentworth and William Petty allows for an examination of the distinct nature of colonial government, especially with regard to its practical implementation. Each of the selected individuals determined the practical implication of English rule in Ireland. The role of John Davies as Solicitor General in Ireland in 1608 allows insights into the emergence of colonial rule as part of a legalised political structure , in contrast to earlier strategies which were based on violent conquest and military suppression. Thomas Wentworth as Lord Deputy profoundly shaped colonial policies during the tumultuous 1630s and considered aiming to institutionalise English rule in Ireland, restructuring all aspects of colonial society in the process. William Petty, on the other hand, represents the emergence of the colonial expert in the 1650s, linking scientific elements to economic considerations. Petty s subsequent concepts, based on social engineering and the radical exploitation of Ireland, saw the beginning of a new and modern colonial vision by the late seventeenth century. This thesis argues that examining colonialism from three distinct but interlinked perspectives helps to uncover the manifold patterns and the specific contexts of colonial rule in Ireland, thus addressing the balance between change and continuity that characterised English colonial strategies during the seventeenth century.en
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublin. School of Histories & Humanities. Discipline of Historyen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectIrish Historyen
dc.subject17th centuryen
dc.subjectEarly Modern Historyen
dc.subjectColonialismen
dc.titleOne phenomenon, Three perspectives. English colonial strategies in Ireland revisited, 1603-1680en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.sponsor-en
dc.relation.references-en
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.type.qualificationlevelPostgraduate Doctoren
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/hingstmen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid191205en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess


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