The Irish-African Partnership for Research Capacity Building (IAPRCB) brings together all nine universities on the island of Ireland and four universities in Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania and Uganda in a unique, high-level partnership to develop a coordinated approach to Research Capacity Building (RCB) in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in order to make an effective contribution to the reduction of poverty in those countries.


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Recent Submissions

  • Strategic aid allocation in the 21st century: lessons from the 1980?s and 1990 

    Verschoor, Arjan (Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland, 2006)
    An evaluation of recipient countries? experience with foreign aid in the 1980s and 90s shows that there is plenty of evidence that policy conditionality has by and large failed, and that there is no evidence that the ...
  • Improving coherence between Irish trade and development policy from an African perspective 

    Matthews, Alan (Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland, 2006)
    The recent Irish Trade Policy Statement devoted a whole chapter to the trade needs of developing countries (DETE, 2005). In it, the Government recognises the role that trade policy can play in providing economic development ...
  • Trade and industry 

    Fitzpatrick, Jim (Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland, 1985)
    This paper discusses trade aspects of Ireland's relations with Third World countries. As implied in the overall title of the symposium, "Ireland, Europe and the Third World", the topic is dealt with in a European Community ...
  • The question of aid 

    O'Neill, Helen (Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland, 1985)
    The purpose of this paper is to describe very briefly what Ireland and its EC partners have been doing in recent years and to raise some issues for discussion at this symposium which are likely to be important over the ...
  • Perspectives on globalisation 

    Leen, Maura (Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland, 2002)
    The level of public and political debate on the subject of globalisation has grown considerably in recent years. However, as the term enters popular vocabulary, terms such as pro- or anti-globalisation obscure the issues ...

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