Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJACKSON, ISABELLA
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-14T10:39:36Z
dc.date.available2019-10-14T10:39:36Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.date.submitted2018en
dc.identifier.citationJackson, I., Book Review of Sold People: Traffickers and Family Life in North China by Johanna S. Ransmeier, Journal of Asian Studies, 2018, 77, 1, 241-242en
dc.identifier.otherN
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-asian-studies/article/sold-people-traffickers-and-family-life-in-north-china-by-johanna-s-ransmeier-cambridge-mass-harvard-university-press-2017-ix-395-pp-isbn-9780674971974-cloth/AE464728DCE91CD09E8747F89235CFD9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/89716
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractAccording to Chinese government estimates, 10,000 children are trafficked in China every year. Johanna Ransmeier’s meticulous and highly engaging study of the trade in people in the late Qing and Republican periods provides an invaluable historical context for understanding the contemporary problem, while also revealing the changing dynamics of the family unit from an entirely fresh perspective. Drawing on new material from police and court records from 1870 to the 1930s, she shows that families at every level of society engaged in buying and selling wives, concubines, child brides, prostitutes,servants, apprentices, and adopted children. While the volume of sales increased at times of crisis, selling a relative was not, as it was generally presented and as has been assumed,a last resort countenanced only by the poorest families. It was rather a socially sanctioned choice facilitated by the universal acceptance of what Ransmeier terms “the transactional family.” Marriage was generally secured by the exchange of money—bride price or a dowry—and concubines were gained through payments in exchange for their “reproductive labor”. Matchmakers arranged such transactions for a fee. This way of introducing women into the household normalized other transactions in human beings.en
dc.format.extent241-242en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Asian Studies;
dc.relation.ispartofseries77;
dc.relation.ispartofseries1;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectHuman traffickingen
dc.subjectChinaen
dc.titleSold People: Traffickers and Family Life in North Chinaen
dc.typeReviewen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/jacksoni
dc.identifier.rssinternalid187138
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S0021911817001747
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDTagChinese Historyen
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0003-3778-8017
dc.subject.darat_thematicHistoryen
dc.status.accessibleNen


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record