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dc.contributor.advisorKeatinge, Patrick
dc.contributor.advisorMarsh, Michael
dc.contributor.advisorRees, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, John Terence
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-06T12:40:58Z
dc.date.available2018-12-06T12:40:58Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationJohn Terence O'Neill, 'The adaption of United Nations peacekeeping in the post-Cold War international system', [thesis], Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). Department of Political Science, 2001, pp 377
dc.identifier.otherTHESIS 6176
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/85493
dc.description.abstractThis study examines United Nations peacekeeping as practised between 1956 and 1999. In particular, it considers how the ending of the Cold War affected the conduct and performance of operations. Having traced the development of international collective action, it examines in detail four operations, two of which commenced during the Cold War and two of which were launched in the early 1990's. In this way, it seeks to establish whether the later operations were significantly different from those of the earlier era. Much o f the work is based on the personal experience of the author and on information gathered through interviews with military personnel, from Ireland and several other European countries, who served on various UN operations. The observations and comments of those interviewed are considered particularly valuable since many were participants in, or observers of, significant events in the history of peacekeeping. Moreover, several were Force Commanders, contingent commanders or holders of senior staff appointments and therefore played a major part in the overall development of UN peacekeeping activities. Their contributions are supplemented by the observations of civilians who either served at UN Headquarters in New York or held senior appointments on operations. These observations from 'practitioners' are set alongside the written work of academics and commentators from Britain, Europe, North America and the Antipodes. In this way, a broad picture of peacekeeping is presented. The study concludes that whatever the period in which they were conducted, most peacekeeping operations have proved less than satisfactory. Failure to meet expectations is seen as resulting from the inability o f UN member states to agree upon (a) clear achievable objectives, (b) the precise nature of operations, and (c) provision of the necessary resources.
dc.format1 volume
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTrinity College (Dublin, Ireland). Department of Political Science
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://stella.catalogue.tcd.ie/iii/encore/record/C__Rb12460408
dc.subjectPolitics, Ph.D.
dc.subjectPh.D. Trinity College Dublin
dc.titleThe adaption of United Nations peacekeeping in the post-Cold War international system
dc.typethesis
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertations
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publications
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.format.extentpaginationpp 377
dc.description.noteTARA (Trinity’s Access to Research Archive) has a robust takedown policy. Please contact us if you have any concerns: rssadmin@tcd.ie
dc.description.notePrint thesis water damaged as a result of the Berkeley Library Podium flood 25/10/2011


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