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dc.contributor.authorWatson, Iarfhlaith
dc.contributor.authorNic Ghiolla Phádgraig, Máire
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-29T14:55:13Z
dc.date.available2016-07-29T14:55:13Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationWatson, Iarfhlaith; Nic Ghiolla Phádgraig, Máire. 'Linguistic Elitism: the Advantage of Speaking Irish Rather than the Irish-speaker Advantage'. - Economic & Social Review, Vol. 42, No. 4, Winter, 2011, pp437-454, Dublin: Economic & Social Research Institute
dc.identifier.issn0012-9984
dc.identifier.otherJEL XXX
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/76761
dc.description.abstractThis paper contributes to the discussion of linguistic elitism in this journal (Borooah et al., 2009). Two main questions are addressed. First, most “census Irish speakers” are not in fact Irish speakers and the majority of Irish speakers proper are not a coherent group. Second, the Irish language is part of the cultural capital which can be acquired by people with an “advantage.” The argument is made that people with an advantage are more likely to speak Irish rather than Irish speakers being more likely to have an advantage.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEconomic & Social Studies
dc.sourceEconomic & Social Reviewen
dc.subjectLanguage useen
dc.subjectIrishen
dc.subjectlinguistic elitismen
dc.titleLinguistic Elitism: the Advantage of Speaking Irish Rather than the Irish-speaker Advantage
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.publisher.placeDublinen
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess


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