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dc.contributor.authorHennessy, Martina
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-29T13:43:49Z
dc.date.available2024-01-29T13:43:49Z
dc.date.created2021en
dc.date.issued2021
dc.date.submitted2021en
dc.identifier.citationRidge K, Conlon N, Hennessy M, Dunne P.J, Feasibility assessment of an 8-week attention-based training programme in the management of chronic spontaneous urticaria, Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 7, 1, 2021en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/104811
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractBackground: Prescribing error represent a significant source of preventable harm to patients. Prescribing errors at discharge, including omission of pre-admission medications (PAM), are particularly harmful as they frequently propagate following discharge. This study assesses the impact of an educational intervention and introduction of an electronic patient record (EPR) in the same centre on omission of PAM at discharge using a pragmatic design. A survey of newly qualified doctors is used to contextualise findings. Methods: Discharge prescriptions and discharge summaries were reviewed at discharge, and compared to admission medicine lists, using a paper-based chart system. Discrepancies were noted, using Health Information and Quality Authority guidelines for discharge prescribing. An educational intervention was conducted. Further review of discharge prescriptions and discharge summaries took place. Following introduction of an EPR, review of discharge summaries and discharge prescriptions was repeated. A survey was administered to recently qualified doctors (interns), and analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Results: Omission of PAM as prescribed or discontinued items at discharge occurs frequently. An educational inter- vention did not significantly change prescribing error rates (U = 1255.5, p = 0.206). EPR introduction did significantly reduce omission of PAM on discharge prescribing (U = 694, p < 0.001), however there was also a reduction in the rate of deliberate discontinuation of PAM at discharge (U = 1237.5, p = 0.007). Survey results demonstrated that multiple sources are required to develop a discharge prescription. Time pressure, access to documentation and lack of admission medicine reconciliation are frequently cited causes of discharge prescribing error. Conclusion: This study verified passive educational interventions alone do not improve discharge prescribing. Introduction of EPR improved discharge prescribing, but negatively impacted deliberate discontinuation of PAM at discharge. This is attributable to reduced access to key sources of information used in formulating discharge prescriptions, and separation of the discontinuation function from the prescribing function on the EPR discharge application.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPilot and Feasibility Studies;
dc.relation.ispartofseries7;
dc.relation.ispartofseries1;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectDischargeen
dc.subjectPrescribingen
dc.subjectTransitionen
dc.subjectE-healthen
dc.subjectMedical educationen
dc.titleFeasibility assessment of an 8-week attention-based training programme in the management of chronic spontaneous urticariaen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/mhenness
dc.identifier.rssinternalid261601
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-021-00841-z
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.identifier.rssurihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85108879405&doi=10.1186%2fs40814-021-00870-8&partnerID=40&md5=d7377da067c06c11519404ec37c59838
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0002-2153-5288


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