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dc.contributor.advisorPierse, Dermoten
dc.contributor.authorKielty, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-18T13:40:41Z
dc.date.available2022-10-18T13:40:41Z
dc.date.issued2022en
dc.date.submitted2022en
dc.identifier.citationKielty, Paul, The Perceived Effect of Covid-19 on Undergraduate Education in Oral Surgery - A Qualitative Study, Trinity College Dublin.School of Dental Sciences, 2022en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/101359
dc.descriptionAPPROVEDen
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Covid-19 has had a profound impact on all of our lives since it was first described in Wuhan in December 2019. Oral Surgery is a specialty which involves teaching undergraduate dental students skills required for general dental practice, and so competence is a requirement for timely graduation. Educational and healthcare settings were disproportionally affected by the pandemic, with particular effects on in-person training, lectures and traditional examination techniques. This study assessed the perceived impact of Covid-19 on final year undergraduate dental students in the Oral Surgery Department, Dublin Dental University Hospital. Methods A qualitative analysis was performed using semi-structured online interviews of final year dental students in our Dental Hospital. Their opinions were sought on the impact of the pandemic on their training, and their comments on the changes in teaching and learning methodologies which were required due to restrictions. Their responses were recorded and transcribed to allow for qualitative coding, and thematic analysis was then performed to identify trends and offer suggestions for future improvements based upon responses given by participants. Discussion As a result of the pandemic, students felt they has reduced clinical experience, when compared with their predecessors. Despite this, they felt they were able to make best use of the time available to them on their return to clinical teaching. Online teaching was perceived to be less effective than in-person teaching, but where remote learning was used, recorded or on-demand lectures were preferred to live lectures. open-book examinations were perceived to be more relevant for clinical subjects such as Oral Surgery, and provided skills in critical thinking which were more transferrable to independent clinical practice. Conclusion Many changes to teaching and learning in the Oral Surgery Department were required to be implemented during the Covid-19 pandemic, and in an uncertain external environment. Students embraced these changes and felt some were more effective than traditional teaching and examination methods. Adaptations to education during Covid-19 can be utilised for Oral Surgery training into the future.en
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublin. School of Dental Sciences. Discipline of Dental Scienceen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectOral Surgeryen
dc.subjectCovid-19en
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectUndergraduateen
dc.subjectDental Studentsen
dc.titleThe Perceived Effect of Covid-19 on Undergraduate Education in Oral Surgery - A Qualitative Studyen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameProfessional Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.Ch.Dent)en
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttps://tcdlocalportal.tcd.ie/pls/EnterApex/f?p=800:71:0::::P71_USERNAME:PKIELTYen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid246844en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess


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