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dc.contributor.advisorGallagher, Arlene
dc.contributor.authorDavey, Christopher Michael
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-04T08:36:27Z
dc.date.available2022-05-04T08:36:27Z
dc.date.issued2022en
dc.date.submitted2022
dc.identifier.citationDavey, Christopher Michael, Evaluation of STEM@University Experiences for Transition Year Students, Trinity College Dublin.School of Physics, 2022en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/98527
dc.descriptionAPPROVEDen
dc.description.abstractThis master's monograph and research present a study on the influence of STEM@University (a non-formal, university-school intervention) on a Transition Year student's STEM identity, through the measurement of STEM capital, self-efficacy, and autonomy. This 6-week long learning intervention sought to provide a learning opportunity that would enhance the student's STEM identity and university readiness, at this transitional time in their formal education. Given the COVID-19 restrictions, the experience was entirely delivered remotely via Microsoft Teams. The learning experience was a blend of synchronous and asynchronous sessions, and it provided opportunities to enhance self-efficacy and learner autonomy. An assessment of the student's experience was conducted using three instruments, the Index of Science Capital, Sources of Science Self-Efficacy and Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire, a review of student artefacts including their reflections, a pre- and post- experience survey and a post-experience focus group. The data collected provided quantitative and qualitative insight into the experiences of 12 individual students. Upon analysis of the data collected from the students' STEM capital, sources of science self-efficacy and Relative Autonomy Index (RAI), no statistically significant change occurred in these students during their time at STEM@University. These quantitative results are contrasting with the qualitative data that was collected in a focus group format that indicated that the students felt they had become more autonomous learners, more aware of STEM careers and areas of study and that participating in the STEM@University made STEM a less intimidating environment for them. This study finds that of the 12 students, 6 had an overall positive shift in their STEM identity, while 4 saw a negative shift. This research concludes that while a portion of students indicated that STEM@University did achieve its desired goals, these students may already be comfortable with working autonomously, and the programme suited their learning preferences. In future iterations of student evaluation, these selected instruments may be too blunt to accurately assess the desired students' outcomes, however securing a larger sample size will be essential to accurately evaluate their effectiveness and the STEM@University experience for Transition Year students.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublin. School of Physics. Discipline of Physicsen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectSTEM Educationen
dc.subjectSTEM Identity Capitalen
dc.subjectSTEM Capitalen
dc.subjectSelf-Efficacyen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectTransition Yearen
dc.subjectNon-Formal Learningen
dc.titleEvaluation of STEM@University Experiences for Transition Year Studentsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.sponsorTrinity College Dublin (TCD)en
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters (Research)en
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttps://tcdlocalportal.tcd.ie/pls/EnterApex/f?p=800:71:0::::P71_USERNAME:CDAVEYen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid242638en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess


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