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dc.contributor.advisorMarples, Nicolaen
dc.contributor.authorCARROLL, ROSARIO MARGARETen
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T06:51:28Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T06:51:28Z
dc.date.issued2019en
dc.date.submitted2019en
dc.identifier.citationCARROLL, ROSARIO MARGARET, The Effects of Culling on the Badger (Meles meles) Population in Ireland., Trinity College Dublin.School of Natural Sciences, 2019en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/89497
dc.descriptionAPPROVEDen
dc.description.abstractThe European badger (Meles meles) has also been identified as the main wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB). Consequently, badgers are culled nationwide as part of the bTB eradiation scheme. The control program carried out by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM), provided an unparalleled opportunity to study the effects of long term culling on a protected mammal species. This project combined two main components: one, to investigate the effects of culling at population level, social group level and an individual level and two, to accurately predict parturition to define the most appropriate and humane closed season. Surprisingly, and contrary to much of the published literature, repeated culling as found to have a minimal effect on the population dynamics and social group sizes of Irish badgers. The age profile of the immigrating/dispersing females was also unexpected, as it was not primarily made up of younger females but instead it was a mix of adults and aged adults. However, there were some significant differences seen between individuals in repeatedly culled areas and those from undisturbed areas. Females in repeatedly culled areas had significantly fewer blastocysts and those that did breed had significantly smaller litters. This study also determined that teat width, length and mammary gland depth change significantly with pregnancy and that reproductively active females could be distinguished from their non-breeding counterparts using these criteria early as January. With fecundity not decreasing as expected, this means that there may be ethical concerns for culling in repeatedly culled areas during the breeding season as lactating females may be culled and their cubs left to starve. This brings into questions the effectiveness of the current closed season, which would appear to be too short, at the wrong time of year and not currently implemented in all areas. A change to this current policy is strongly recommended.en
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublin. School of Natural Sciences. Discipline of Zoologyen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectBadgers, culling, bovine tuberculosis, bTB.en
dc.titleThe Effects of Culling on the Badger (Meles meles) Population in Ireland.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF)en
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttps://tcdlocalportal.tcd.ie/pls/EnterApex/f?p=800:71:0::::P71_USERNAME:CARROLRMen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid206942en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess


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