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dc.contributor.authorBOKDE, ARUNen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-17T10:58:53Z
dc.date.available2016-10-17T10:58:53Z
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationRuggeri B, Nymberg C, Vuoksimaa E, Lourdusamy A, Wong CP, Carvalho FM, Jia T, Cattrell A, Macare C, Banaschewski T, Barker GJ, Bokde AL, Bromberg U, Büchel C, Conrod PJ, Fauth-Bühler M, Flor H, Frouin V, Gallinat J, Garavan H, Gowland P, Heinz A, Ittermann B, Martinot JL, Nees F, Pausova Z, Paus T, Rietschel M, Robbins T, Smolka MN, Spanagel R, Bakalkin G, Mill J, Sommer WH, Rose RJ, Yan J, Aliev F, Dick D, Kaprio J, Desrivières S, Schumann G, Association of Protein Phosphatase PPM1G With Alcohol Use Disorder and Brain Activity During Behavioral Control in a Genome-Wide Methylation Analysis., The American journal of psychiatry, 172, 6, 2015, 543-52en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/77502
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractThe genetic component of alcohol use disorder is substantial, but monozygotic twin discordance indicates a role for nonheritable differences that could be mediated by epigenetics. Despite growing evidence associating epigenetics and psychiatric disorders, it is unclear how epigenetics, particularly DNA methylation, relate to brain function and behavior, including drinking behavior. METHOD: The authors carried out a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation of 18 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for alcohol use disorder and validated differentially methylated regions. After validation, the authors characterized these differentially methylated regions using personality trait assessment and functional MRI in a sample of 499 adolescents. RESULTS: Hypermethylation in the 3'-protein-phosphatase-1G (PPM1G) gene locus was associated with alcohol use disorder. The authors found association of PPM1G hypermethylation with early escalation of alcohol use and increased impulsiveness. They also observed association of PPM1G hypermethylation with increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent response in the right subthalamic nucleus during an impulsiveness task. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the authors provide first evidence for an epigenetic marker associated with alcohol consumption and its underlying neurobehavioral phenotype.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSupported by the European Union-funded FP6 Integrated Project IMAGEN (Reinforcement-related behaviour in normal brain function and psychopathology) (LSHM-CT- 2007-037286); the FP7 projects IMAGEMEND, MATRICS, and the Innovative Medicine Initiative Project EU-AIMS (115300-2); Medical Research Council Programme Grant “Developmental pathways into adolescent substance abuse” (93558); the Swedish Research Council FORMAS; and NIH grant U54-EB020403 (“ENIGMA Center for Worldwide Medicine, Imaging and Genetics”). Further support was provided by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (Germany) (eMED SysAlc; AERIAL; 1EV0711) and the German Research Foundation (Reinhart-Koselleck Award SP 383/5-1). Dr. Vuoksimaa was supported by the Academy of Finland (grant 257075). Data collection and analyses in the FinnTwin16 study have been supported by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (grants AA-12502, AA-00145, and AA-09203 to Dr. Rose) and the Academy of Finland (grants 100499, 205585, 118555, 141054 and 264146 to Dr. Kaprio).en
dc.format.extent543-52en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe American journal of psychiatryen
dc.relation.ispartofseries172en
dc.relation.ispartofseries6en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectalcohol use disorderen
dc.subject.lcshalcohol use disorderen
dc.titleAssociation of Protein Phosphatase PPM1G With Alcohol Use Disorder and Brain Activity During Behavioral Control in a Genome-Wide Methylation Analysis.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/bokdeaen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid111433en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.14030382en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeNeuroscienceen
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0003-0114-4914en


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