Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCallan, Tim
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Brian
dc.contributor.authorO'Donoghue, Cathal
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-27T09:19:00Z
dc.date.available2012-08-27T09:19:00Z
dc.date.issued1996
dc.identifier.citationCallan, Tim; Nolan, Brian; O'Donoghue, Cathal. 'What has happened to replacement rates?'. - Economic & Social Review, Vol. 27, No. 5, October, 1996, pp. 439-456, Dublin: Economic & Social Research Institute
dc.identifier.issn0012-9984
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/64762
dc.description.abstractThis paper compares different approaches to measuring changes in replacement rates in Ireland over time. Results based on microsimulation modelling suggest that the average replacement rate facing unemployed persons was roughly constant between 1987 and 1994, with a small rise for those on Unemployment Assistance offset by a decline for those on Unemployment Benefit. The mean predicted wage facing the unemployed is about two-thirds of the average industrial wage. Time-series constructed using average expenditure per unemployment compensation recipient and average earnings do not accurately reflect changes in mean replacement rates. In addition to providing a better measure of the overall trend in replacement rates, microsimulation modelling provides a picture of their distribution, showing that the incidence of cash replacement rates over 80 per cent fell between 1987 and 1994 but the numbers facing rates between 70 and 80 per cent rose.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEconomic & Social Studies
dc.sourceEconomic & Social Reviewen
dc.subjectReplacement ratesen
dc.subjectUnemploymenten
dc.subjectIrelanden
dc.subjectLabour marketen
dc.titleWhat has happened to replacement rates?
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.publisher.placeDublinen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record