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dc.contributor.authorCallan, Tim
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-07T08:53:28Z
dc.date.available2012-07-07T08:53:28Z
dc.date.issued1991
dc.identifier.citationCallan, Tim. 'Male-female wage differentials in Ireland'. - Economic & Social Review, Vol. 23, No.1, October 1991, pp. 55-72. Dublin: Economic & Social Research Institute
dc.identifier.issn0012-9984
dc.identifier.otherJEL J16
dc.identifier.otherJEL J31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/64178
dc.description.abstractThe persistence of sizeable male-female earnings differentials despite the introduction of a range of anti-discrimination measures has been a focus of concern in many countries. In Ireland the ratio of female to male wage rates rose by about 8 percentage points between 1975 and 1980, following the implementation of equal pay legislation (1975) and anti-discrimination legislation (1977); but since that time the ratio has been approximately stable at about 68 per cent. The current situation is, therefore, not untypical of that in many other countries.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEconomic & Social Studies
dc.sourceEconomic & Social Reviewen
dc.subjectGender wage differentialsen
dc.subjectIrelanden
dc.subjectEqualityen
dc.subjectWage differentialsen
dc.titleMale-female wage differentials in Ireland
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.publisher.placeDublinen


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