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dc.contributor.authorNICHOLAS, CHRISTOPHERen
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-05T12:59:35Z
dc.date.available2012-03-05T12:59:35Z
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.date.submitted2012en
dc.identifier.citationHellawell, J & Nicholas, C. J., Acid Treatment effects on the stable isotopic signature of fossils, Palaeontology, 55, 1, 2012, 1 - 10en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/62534
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractPrior to geochemical analyses, fossil bones and teeth are often extracted from any surrounding lithified sediments using chemical techniques such as immersion in acid. As stable isotope analysis becomes more commonplace in palaeoecological investigations, it is important to consider what effects these chemical preparation techniques may have on any subsequent isotopic data and to constrain these effects as quantitatively as possible. This study aims to elucidate these effects, as it is vital that variability in a data set should not be introduced as a result of protocols used during sample preparation; in addition, it defines the most effective and viable method of carbonate removal for processing bulk fossil samples without causing alteration of their stable isotopic signatures. Various strengths of two weak acids commonly used during palaeontological preparation were tested to evaluate their effects on the ?15N and ?13Corg isotopic signatures of the vertebrae of a large Eocene fossil fish. Changes in the isotopic values occurred over time regardless of which acid was used, each causing a variable response in both ?15N and ?13Corg isotopic values. Without careful monitoring of the acidification process in a controlled environment, any resulting data could therefore confound interpretation. Based on these experiments, it is recommended that 2 m acetic acid be used for the pretreatment of fossils prior to the acquisition of N and C isotope data where carbonate removal is necessary.en
dc.description.sponsorshipor useful discussions during planning of these experiments, we would like to thank R. J. Beynon, University of Liverpool, UK, I.T Burke, University of Leeds, UK and P. Kenny, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. The authors are also grateful to R. D. G. Goodhue, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, for technical support and expertise. M. Steinthorsdottir, Stockholms Universitet, Sweden, read an earlier draft of the manuscript and provided helpful comments for its improvement. In addition, we are very grateful to J. R. Wheeley, University of Birmingham, UK, A. Zazzo, CNRS ? Museum national d?Histoire naturelle, France, and an anonymous reviewer for their many helpful comments and suggestions. This work was funded by a Science Foundation Ireland studentship.en
dc.format.extent1en
dc.format.extent10en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPalaeontologyen
dc.relation.ispartofseries55en
dc.relation.ispartofseries1en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectPalaeontologyen
dc.subjectnitrogen isotopesen
dc.titleAcid Treatment effects on the stable isotopic signature of fossilsen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience Foundation Ireland (SFI)en
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/nicholyjen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid77258en
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-4983.2011.01108.xen


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