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dc.contributor.authorKELLY, DANIELen
dc.contributor.authorBUCKLEY, CONORen
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-09T17:21:33Z
dc.date.available2010-11-09T17:21:33Z
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.date.submitted2009en
dc.identifier.citationBuckley, C.T., Thorpe, S.D., Kelly, D.J., Engineering of large cartilaginous constructs through the use of microchanneled hydrogels and rotational culture, Tissue Engineering A, 15, 11, 2009, 3213-3220en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/41118
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.descriptionPMID: 19374490en
dc.description.abstractThe development of functional engineered cartilaginous tissues of sufficient size that can be used clinically to treat large defects remains a major and significant challenge. This study investigated if the introduction of microchannels into chondrocyte-seeded agarose hydrogels would result in the formation of a superior and more homogenous cartilaginous tissue due to enhanced nutrient transport. Microchannel construct cylinders were fabricated via a moulding process utilising a pillared structure to create the required architecture. Constructs were subjected to either constant rotation in a rotational bioreactor system or free swelling conditions. After 28 days of free swelling culture the presence of microchannels did not enhance GAG accumulation within the core of the construct compared to solid constructs (0.317 ? 0.002 % w/w vs. 0.401 ? 0.020 % w/w). However under dynamically rotating conditions, GAG accumulation in the cores (1.165 ? 0.132 % w/w) of microchannel constructs were similar to that in the periphery (1.23 ? 0.074 % w/w) of solid constructs, although still significantly lower than their corresponding periphery (1.64 ? 0.133 % w/w) after 28 days. These results confirm that cellular nutrient consumption is primarily responsible for creating the spatial gradients in molecules regulating the biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes through the volume of hydrogels, and that changing the scaffold architecture alone may have little effect while the inherent diffusivity of the material remains high. Rather a combination of forced convection and modified scaffold architecture is necessary to engineer large cartilaginous tissues in vitro.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding was provided by Science Foundation Ireland (07-RFP- ENMF142) and Enterprise Ireland (PC / 2006/ 384).en
dc.format.extent3213-3220en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTissue Engineering Aen
dc.relation.ispartofseries15en
dc.relation.ispartofseries11en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectBioengineeringen
dc.subjectCartilage repairen
dc.titleEngineering of large cartilaginous constructs through the use of microchanneled hydrogels and rotational cultureen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience Foundation Ireland (SFI)en
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/kellyd9en
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/cbuckleen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid57638en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.tea.2008.0531en
dc.subject.TCDThemeNext Generation Medical Devicesen
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0003-4091-0992en


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