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dc.contributor.authorHOLLAND, CELIAen
dc.contributor.authorJACKSON, ANDREWen
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-17T08:56:07Z
dc.date.available2010-06-17T08:56:07Z
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.date.submitted2009en
dc.identifier.citationKirwan, P., Asaolu, S.O., Molloy, S.F., Abiona, T. C., Jackson, A.L. & Holland, C.V., Soil-transmitted helminth infections in Nigerian children aged 0-25 months, Journal of Helminthology, 83, 2009, 261 - 266en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/40168
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence and intensity of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) in children aged 0?25 months and to identify the associated risk factors for Ascaris lumbricoides infections. The study was conducted in three villages outside Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria in May/June 2005. Stool samples (369) were processed by formol-ether concentration. Ascaris lumbricoides (12.2%) was the dominant infection. Age, father's occupation and dog ownership were identified as the significant risk factors in the minimal adequate model for A. lumbricoides. The odds of being infected with A. lumbricoides increased as the children got older. Children aged 12?17 months and 18?25 months were 8.8 and 12.4 times, respectively, more likely to harbour Ascaris than those aged 7?11 months. The odds of harbouring Ascaris for children whose families owned a dog were 3.5 times that of children whose families did not own a dog. Children whose fathers were businessmen were 0.4 times less likely to be infected with Ascaris than those whose fathers were farmers. The findings from this study suggest that many of these young children, who are at a critical stage of development, are infected with Ascaris and that the prevalence of infection with this parasite increases with age. This study has highlighted the need to incorporate preschool children into deworming programmes in endemic regions and to investigate innovative ways of delivering cost-effective deworming treatment to this high-risk age group.en
dc.format.extent261en
dc.format.extent266en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Helminthologyen
dc.relation.ispartofseries83en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectZoologyen
dc.subjectSoil-transmitted helminthsen
dc.subjectAscaris lumbricoidesen
dc.titleSoil-transmitted helminth infections in Nigerian children aged 0-25 monthsen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorIrish Research Council for Science and Engineering Technology (IRCSET)en
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/chollanden
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/jacksoanen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid55268en
dc.subject.TCDThemeImmunology, Inflammation & Infectionen
dc.subject.TCDThemeSmart & Sustainable Planeten
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022149X08201252en


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