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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/8260

Title: The cost of adopting a complete system of public prosecution in England, as illustrated by the results of the working of the Scotch and Irish systems of public prosecution
Author: Hancock, W. Neilson
Keywords: English law reform
Public prosecution system
Issue Date: 1879
Publisher: Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland
Citation: Hancock, W. Neilson. 'The cost of adopting a complete system of public prosecution in England, as illustrated by the results of the working of the Scotch and Irish systems of public prosecution'. - Dublin: Journal of the Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland,Vol. VII, Part LIII, 1878/1879, pp271-274
Series/Report no.: Journal of The Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland
Vol. VII, Part LIII, 1878/1879
Abstract: There are many indications that the extension to England of the system of Public Prosecution which has so long existed both in Scotland and Ireland is only a question of time. This assimilation of the laws of the United Kingdom was recommended by a Royal Commission so far back as 1844; it was recommended by a Parliamentary Committee in 1856 and by another Committee in 1870. Bills were introduced on the subject in the sessions of 1870, 1871, and 1872, with different names on them in the several years, but including Mr. Walpole, Viscount Sandon, Mr. Russell Gurney, Mr. Vernon Harcourt, Mr. Rathbone, and Mr. Eykyn. In 1873 a Bill was introduced by the Government. As an indication of the strength of feeling entertained on the subject, I may quote a few words from Mr. Walpole's speech on the 19th of June, 1872: “It was really a disgrace—and he used the word advisedly—that England was the only country in the world where prosecutions for crime should be mostly left at the mercy of private individuals, who might or might not proceed with them as they thought fit”.
Description: Read at the Section of Economic Science and Statistics of the British Association, at Plymouth, August, 1877
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/8260
ISSN: 00814776
Appears in Collections:Archive JSSISI: 1847- Complete Collection
JSSISI: 1876 to 1879, Vol. VII, Parts L to LV

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