The University of Dublin | Trinity College -- Ollscoil Átha Cliath | Coláiste na Tríonóide
Trinity's Access to Research Archive
Home :: Log In :: Submit :: Alerts ::

TARA >
School of Medicine >
Medical Gerontology >
Medical Gerontology (Scholarly Publications) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/63913

Title: Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults.
Author: O'HALLORAN, AISLING
Author's Homepage: http://people.tcd.ie/aiohallo
Keywords: Falls
Sustained Attention
Older Adults
Issue Date: 2011
Citation: O'Halloran AM, Pénard N, Galli A, Fan CW, Robertson IH, Kenny RA, Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults., BMC geriatrics, 11, 85, 2011, 10
Series/Report no.: BMC geriatrics
11
85
Abstract: Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT), commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale) were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05) in older adults. An increase in omission errors was also associated with falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05). Upon controlling for age and gender affects, logistic regression modelling revealed that increasing variability associated with the vigilance (top-down) aspect of sustained attention was a retrospective predictor of falling (p < 0.01, OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03 – 1.26) in the previous year and was weakly correlated with reduced falls efficacy in non-fallers (p = 0.07). Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention strategies.
Description: PUBLISHED
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/63913
Related links: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2318/11/85
Appears in Collections:Medical Gerontology (Scholarly Publications)

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
BMC Geriatrics_Sustained attention and Falls_provisionalPDF.pdfPublished (author's copy) - Peer Reviewed359.84 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is protected by original copyright


Please note: There is a known bug in some browsers that causes an error when a user tries to view large pdf file within the browser window. If you receive the message "The file is damaged and could not be repaired", please try one of the solutions linked below based on the browser you are using.

Items in TARA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback