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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/60818

Title: "I hate having nobody here, I'd like to know where they all are": Can qualitative research detect differences in Quality of Life among Nursing Home Residents with different levels of Cognitive Impairment?
Author: CAHILL, SUZANNE
DIAZ-PONCE, ANA
Author's Homepage: http://people.tcd.ie/cahillsu
http://people.tcd.ie/diazpoam
Keywords: Health policy and services
Dementia
cognitive impairment
quality of life
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Citation: Cahill S & Diaz-Ponce A, "I hate having nobody here, I'd like to know where they all are": Can qualitative research detect differences in Quality of Life among Nursing Home Residents with different levels of Cognitive Impairment?, Ageing and Mental Health, 15, 5, 2011, 562-572
Series/Report no.: Ageing and Mental Health;
15;
5;
Abstract: Objective: To ascertain if similarities or differences exist in perceptions of quality of life (QoL) amongst nursing 10 home (NH) residents with different levels of cognitive impairment (CI). Method: Face-to-face interviews using a simple 15-item semi-structured interview schedule with 61 older people with a CI (13 mild, 20 moderate and 28 severe) living in three Dublin area based NHs. Results: Four key themes of QoL with accompanying sub-themes were identified: (1) social contact, (2) attachment, (3) pleasurable activities and (4) affect. Whilst some similarities existed between the three groups, 15 results showed emerging differences, particularly between those with a mild and severe CI. In particular, the narratives of those with a severe CI reflected an absence of social contact, a quest for human contact and a lack of awareness of structured pleasurable activities. A large majority also reported feelings of loneliness, isolation and a search for home. Conclusions: Findings support the increasing evidence that people with a CI and even those with a probable 20 advanced dementia can often still communicate their views and preferences about what is important to them. Whilst apathy, depression and anxiety are common features of advanced dementia, the social inclusion of these people in the day-to-day ethos of NH life needs a lot more careful consideration. More research is also needed to better understand the chronic and unique needs of this very vulnerable group of people.
Description: PUBLISHED
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/60818
Related links: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2010.551342
Appears in Collections:Administrative Staff Authors (Scholarly Publications)

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