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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/49884

Title: Too much of a good thing? Gender, Concerted cultivation and unequal achievement in primary education
Author: MC COY, SELINA
BANKS, JOANNE
Author's Homepage: http://people.tcd.ie/mccoyse
http://people.tcd.ie/banksjo
Keywords: Education
concerted cultivation
gender
school engagement
academic achievement
maths performance
reading performance
social class
Issue Date: 2010
Citation: McCoy, Selina; Byrne, Delma; Banks, Joanne, Too much of a good thing? Gender, Concerted cultivation and unequal achievement in primary education, 2010
Abstract: It is well established that cultural and economic resources imparted to children vary significantly by social class. Literature on concerted cultivation has highlighted the extent to which out-of-school activities can reproduce social inequalities in the classroom. Within this literature however, little attention has been given to the role of gender in concerted cultivation. In this paper, we use data from the first wave of the Growing Up in Ireland longitudinal study to consider how both social class and gender influence the level and type of out-of-school activities in which children engage. Moreover, we examine how out-of-school activities, class and gender impact on children’s school engagement and academic achievement. We find that while childrearing logics tend to operate within social class categories, there is an additional cultural aspect of gender in the uptake of different types of out-of-school activities. Our findings suggest the need to move beyond explanations of concerted cultivation to explain gender differences in maths and reading attainment.
Description: PUBLISHED
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/49884
Appears in Collections:Sociology (Scholarly Publications)

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