The University of Dublin | Trinity College -- Ollscoil Átha Cliath | Coláiste na Tríonóide
Trinity's Access to Research Archive
Home :: Log In :: Submit :: Alerts ::

TARA >
School of Dental Sciences >
Dental Science >
Dental Science (Scholarly Publications) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/49061

Title: COMPARATIVE GENOMICS AND THE EVOLUTION OF PATHOGENICITY IN HUMAN PATHOGENIC FUNGI
Author: SULLIVAN, DEREK
COLEMAN, DAVID
MORAN, GARY
Sponsor: Science Foundation Ireland
Author's Homepage: http://people.tcd.ie/djsullvn
http://people.tcd.ie/dcoleman
http://people.tcd.ie/gmoran
Keywords: Genome sequencing
comparative genomics
fungi
pathogenesis
evolution
Issue Date: 2011
Citation: MORAN, G.P., COLEMAN, D.C. and SULLIVAN, D.J., COMPARATIVE GENOMICS AND THE EVOLUTION OF PATHOGENICITY IN HUMAN PATHOGENIC FUNGI , EUKARYOTIC CELL, 10, 1, 2011, 34 - 42
Series/Report no.: EUKARYOTIC CELL
10
1
Abstract: Because most fungi have evolved to be free-living in the environment and because the infections they cause are usually opportunistic in nature, it is often difficult to identify specific traits that contribute to fungal pathogenesis. In recent years, there has been a surge in the number of sequenced genomes of human fungal pathogens, and comparison of these sequences has proved to be an excellent resource for exploring commonalities and differences in how these species interact with their hosts. In order to survive in the human body, fungi must be able to adapt to new nutrient sources and environmental stresses. Therefore, genes involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and transport and genes encoding secondary metabolites tend to be overrepresented in pathogenic species (e.g., Aspergillus fumigatus). However, it is clear that human commensal yeast species such as Candida albicans have also evolved a range of specific factors that facilitate direct interaction with host tissues. The evolution of virulence across the human pathogenic fungi has occurred largely through very similar mechanisms. One of the most important mechanisms is gene duplication and the expansion of gene families, particularly in subtelomeric regions. Unlike the case for prokaryotic pathogens, horizontal transfer of genes between species and other genera does not seem to have played a significant role in the evolution of fungal virulence. New sequencing technologies promise the prospect of even greater numbers of genome sequences, facilitating the sequencing of multiple genomes and transcriptomes within individual species, and will undoubtedly contribute to a deeper insight into fungal pathogenesis.
Description: PUBLISHED
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/49061
Related links: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=21076011&dopt=Abstract
Appears in Collections:Dental Science (Scholarly Publications)

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
EC Review(accepted).pdfPublished (author's copy) - Peer Reviewed2.11 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is protected by original copyright


Please note: There is a known bug in some browsers that causes an error when a user tries to view large pdf file within the browser window. If you receive the message "The file is damaged and could not be repaired", please try one of the solutions linked below based on the browser you are using.

Items in TARA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback