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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/40534

Title: Evidence from comparative genomics for a complete sexual cycle in the "asexual" pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata
Author: FARES, MARIO ALI
WOLFE, KENNETH
Sponsor: Science Foundation Ireland
Author's Homepage: http://people.tcd.ie/khwolfe
http://people.tcd.ie/faresm
Keywords: Genetics
Candida glabrata
Issue Date: 2003
Publisher: BioMed Central
Citation: Wong, S., Fares, M. A., Zimmermann, W., Butler, G., Wolfe, K. H., Evidence from comparative genomics for a complete sexual cycle in the "asexual" pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata, Genome Biology, 4, R10, 2003, 1 - 9
Series/Report no.: Genome Biology;
4;
R10;
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Candida glabrata is a pathogenic yeast of increasing medical concern. It has been regarded as asexual since it was first described in 1917, yet phylogenetic analyses have revealed that it is more closely related to sexual yeasts than other Candida species. We show here that the C. glabrata genome contains many genes apparently involved in sexual reproduction. RESULTS: By genome survey sequencing, we find that genes involved in mating and meiosis are as numerous in C. glabrata as in the sexual species Kluyveromyces delphensis, which is its closest known relative. C. glabrata has a putative mating-type (MAT) locus and a pheromone gene (MFALPHA2), as well as orthologs of at least 31 other Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes that have no known roles apart from mating or meiosis, including FUS3, IME1 and SMK1. CONCLUSIONS: We infer that C. glabrata is likely to have an undiscovered sexual stage in its life cycle, similar to that recently proposed for C. albicans. The two Candida species represent two distantly related yeast lineages that have independently become both pathogenic and 'asexual'. Parallel evolution in the two lineages as they adopted mammalian hosts resulted in separate but analogous switches from overtly sexual to cryptically sexual life cycles, possibly in response to defense by the host immune system.
Description: PUBLISHED
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/40534
Related links: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/gb-2003-4-2-r10
Appears in Collections:Genetics (Scholarly Publications)

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