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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/40187

Title: Remodelling by early-life stress of NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity in a gene-environment rat model of depression.
Author: ROWAN, MICHAEL JOSEPH
ANWYL, ROGER
Sponsor: Science Foundation Ireland
European Union (EU)
Author's Homepage: http://people.tcd.ie/mrowan
http://people.tcd.ie/ranwyl
Keywords: Neuroscience
synaptic transmission
depression
NMDA receptor
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Citation: Ryan, B, Musazzi, L, Mallei, A, Tardito, D, Gruber, SH, El Khoury, A, Anwyl, R, Racagni, G, Mathé, AA, Rowan, MJ, Popoli, M, Remodelling by early-life stress of NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity in a gene-environment rat model of depression., International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 12, 4, 2009, 553-559
Series/Report no.: International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology;
12;
4;
Abstract: An animal model of depression combining genetic vulnerability and early-life stress (ELS) was prepared by submitting the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats to a standard paradigm of maternal separation. We analysed hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity in vivo and ionotropic receptors for glutamate in FSL rats, in their controls Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats, and in both lines subjected to ELS. A strong inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) and lower synaptic expression of NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor were found in FSL rats. Remarkably, ELS induced a remodelling of synaptic plasticity only in FSL rats, reducing inhibition of LTP; this was accompanied by marked increase of synaptic NR1 subunit and GluR2/3 subunits of AMPA receptors. Chronic treatment with escitalopram inhibited LTP in FRL rats, but this effect was attenuated by prior ELS. The present results suggest that early gene-environment interactions cause lifelong synaptic changes affecting functional and molecular aspects of plasticity, partly reversed by antidepressant treatments.
Description: PUBLISHED
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/40187
Related links: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1461145708009607
Appears in Collections:Pharmacology & Therapeutics (Scholarly Publications)

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