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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/29626

Title: Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress
Author: Enjalbert, Brice
Moran, Gary
Vaughan, Claire
Yeomans, Tim
MacCallum, Donna
Quinn, Janet
Coleman, David
Brown, Alistair
SULLIVAN, DEREK
Sponsor: Wellcome Trust
Science Foundation Ireland
Health Research Board
Author's Homepage: http://people.tcd.ie/djsullvn
Keywords: Candida dubliniensis
Candida albicans
transcriptional profiling
sodium ion transport
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Brice Enjalbert, Gary P. Moran, Claire Vaughan, Tim Yeomans, Donna M. MacCallum, Janet Quinn, David C. Coleman, Alistair J.P. Brown and Derek J. Sullivan ‘Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress’ in Molecular Microbiology, 72, 1, (2009) pp 216 - 228
Series/Report no.: 72
1
Molecular Microbiology
Abstract: Candida albicans is more pathogenic than Candida dubliniensis. However, this disparity in virulence is surprising given the high level of sequence conservation and the wide range of phenotypic traits shared by these two species. Increased sensitivity to environmental stresses has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor to the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we investigated, in the first comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by transcriptional profiling, global gene expression in each species when grown under conditions in which the two species exhibit differential stress tolerance. The profiles revealed similar core responses to stresses in both species, but differences in the amplitude of the general transcriptional responses to thermal, salt and oxidative stress. Differences in the regulation of specific stress genes were observed between the two species. In particular, ENA21, encoding a sodium ion transporter, was strongly induced in C. albicans but not in C. dubliniensis. In addition, ENA21 was identified in a forward genetic screen for C. albicans genomic sequences that increase salt tolerance in C. dubliniensis. Introduction of a single copy of CaENA21 was subsequently shown to be sufficient to confer salt tolerance upon C. dubliniensis.
Description: PUBLISHED
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2009.06640.x
http://hdl.handle.net/2262/29626
ISSN: 0950-382X
Appears in Collections:Dental Science (Scholarly Publications)

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