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dc.contributor.authorClotworthy, Elaine Maria
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-22T09:14:39Z
dc.date.available2022-02-22T09:14:39Z
dc.date.issued2022en
dc.date.submitted2022
dc.identifier.citationClotworthy, Elaine Maria, Examining the Generalisability of `Social Drama' for Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders to Natural Environments, Trinity College Dublin.School of Education, 2022en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/98149
dc.descriptionAPPROVEDen
dc.description.abstractAutism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are becoming more prevalent in Ireland, with literature positing that a common challenge for those with ASD is generalising social skills from intervention settings to natural environments. This research aimed to assess the generalisability of social skills demonstrated by participants in O Sullivan s Social Drama model, and identify the factors that enhance and inhibit the demonstration of participants social skills in all environments. This study employed an ethnographic case study approach, with two case studies. The data collection tools used were document analysis, questionnaires, observation and interviews and these were designed around the operationalisation of generalisability for this study, which focused on time, setting, individuals present and responses/behaviours of participants. Findings from both case studies show that social skills demonstrated in Social Drama do not generalise to other environments, however, certain elements of the model generalised such as the use of imagination, fictional worlds and role to interact with peers without facilitation in multiple settings. The findings indicate that the type of environments, teaching methodologies, levels of structure and formality in settings outside Social Drama did not enable participants to generalise social skills to these settings. A lack of inclusive education for both participants in their schools was an unexpected finding. The successful methods used to elicit child voice in this study are of note including; modification approach, child led, individualised interviews, role play, co-created improvised storytelling, creation of fictional worlds, games and embodied think aloud protocols. The importance of individualising techniques, and the interviewer knowing the participants was found to be significant in this study. Recommendations include the use of Social Drama methods in educational and home settings to enhance demonstration and generalisability of social skills, education for teachers and parents in use of these methods, and policy changes incorporating compulsory Continuous Professional Development (CPD) for teachers working with children with ASD, inclusion of child voice in research relating to their lives, and embedding creative and imaginative teaching methods in curriculum documents. Limitations in the study included the small sample size, therefore findings are not generalisable to others attending Social Drama classes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublin. School of Education. Discipline of Educationen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectAutism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)en
dc.subjectDramaen
dc.subjectGeneralisability of Social Skillsen
dc.subjectPathological Demand Avoidance (PDA)en
dc.subjectInclusive Educationen
dc.subjectEthnographyen
dc.subjectSocial Dramaen
dc.subjectChild Voiceen
dc.titleExamining the Generalisability of `Social Drama' for Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders to Natural Environmentsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttps://tcdlocalportal.tcd.ie/pls/EnterApex/f?p=800:71:0::::P71_USERNAME:CLOTWOEen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid238475en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsembargoedAccess
dc.date.ecembargoEndDate2024-02-22


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