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dc.contributor.authorHenman, Martin
dc.contributor.authorO'Dwyer, Maire
dc.contributor.authorMc Carron, Mary
dc.contributor.authorMonaghan, Rosemary
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-14T06:48:42Z
dc.date.available2021-07-14T06:48:42Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.date.submitted2021en
dc.identifier.citationMonaghan, R., O'Dwyer, M., Luus, R., Mulryan, N., McCallion, P., McCarron, M., Henman, M.C., The relationship between antiepileptic drug load and challenging behaviors in older adults with intellectual disability and epilepsy, Epilepsy & Behavior, 2021, 122en
dc.identifier.issn1525-5050
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/96748
dc.description.abstractAntiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may affect mood and behavior in people with epilepsy and intellectual disability. A high AED load, derived from AED polytherapy and/or high doses of AEDs, has been suggested to be a risk factor for behavioral side effects. Data were drawn from Wave 3 of the Intellectual Disability Supplement to the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (IDS-TILDA). The Behavior Problems Inventory Short Form (BPI-S) was used to assess challenging behaviors. AED load was calculated and median AED loads obtained. Non-parametric tests and binary logistic regression were performed to determine the relationship between AED load and challenging behaviors. Of participants with a reported diagnosis of epilepsy who were taking a regular AED and had completed BPI-S (n= 142), 62.7% (n= 89) exhibited challenging behaviors. Challenging behavior was found to be more prevalent in those with more severe levels of intellectual disability (p< 0.001). Aggressive/destructive behavior and stereotyped behavior were significantly more likely in participants living in residential/campus settings. For participants with a severe/profound intellectual disability, a significantly higher median AED load was found for participants exhibiting aggressive/destructive behavior and self-injurious behavior (SIB) compared to participants not exhibiting these behaviors, indicating a high AED load may contribute to some behavioral problems in this population group. However, many factors can influence behavioral outcomes, creating difficulties in determining those that are associated and the nature of the association. Careful monitoring of AED load, together with increased vigilance for breakthrough behavioral issues is essential for dealing with these complex cases. Larger studies are needed to account for the potential confounding factors.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEpilepsy & Behavior;
dc.relation.ispartofseries122;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectAED loaden
dc.subjectEpilepsyen
dc.subjectIntellectual disabilityen
dc.subjectChallenging behaviorsen
dc.subjectAntiepileptic drugsen
dc.titleThe relationship between antiepileptic drug load and challenging behaviors in older adults with intellectual disability and epilepsyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/mhenman
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/modwyer6
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/mccarrm
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/monaghar
dc.identifier.rssinternalid232112
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.yebeh.2021.108191
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeAgeingen
dc.subject.TCDThemeInclusive Societyen
dc.subject.TCDTagADVERSE DRUG REACTIONSen
dc.subject.TCDTagADVERSE DRUG-REACTIONSen
dc.subject.TCDTagANTICONVULSANT DRUGSen
dc.subject.TCDTagANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGen
dc.subject.TCDTagANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGSen
dc.subject.TCDTagANTIPSYCHOTIC DRUGSen
dc.subject.TCDTagAgeing and intellectual disabilityen
dc.subject.TCDTagAgeing, Health and Intellectual Disabilityen
dc.subject.TCDTagAging and Intellectual Disabilityen
dc.subject.TCDTagBEHAVIOURen
dc.subject.TCDTagBEHAVIOUR DISTURBANCEen
dc.subject.TCDTagBEHAVIOUR FACTORSen
dc.subject.TCDTagBEHAVIOUR PROBLEMSen
dc.subject.TCDTagBEHAVIOURAL DIFFICULTIESen
dc.subject.TCDTagClinical Pharmacyen
dc.subject.TCDTagEPILEPSYen
dc.subject.TCDTagGENERALIZED EPILEPSYen
dc.subject.TCDTagMEDICATIONen
dc.subject.TCDTagMEDICATION MANAGEMENTen
dc.subject.TCDTagMEDICATION REVIEWen
dc.subject.TCDTagMEDICATION USEen
dc.subject.TCDTagMEDICATIONSen
dc.subject.TCDTagMEDICINES MANAGEMENTen
dc.subject.TCDTagMedication burdenen
dc.subject.TCDTagMedication safetyen
dc.subject.TCDTagMedicinesen
dc.subject.TCDTagMental health and intellectual disabilityen
dc.subject.TCDTagMood Stabilising Drugsen
dc.subject.TCDTagPHARMACEUTICAL CAREen
dc.subject.TCDTagPHARMACY PRACTICEen
dc.subject.TCDTagPatient safetyen
dc.subject.TCDTagPharmaceutical care of the elderlyen
dc.subject.TCDTagPractice of pharmacyen
dc.subject.TCDTagPrescription Medicinesen
dc.subject.TCDTagPsychotropic medicationen
dc.subject.TCDTagPublic Healthen
dc.subject.TCDTagQUALITY USE OF MEDICINESen
dc.subject.TCDTagSEVERE INTELLECTUAL DISABILITYen
dc.subject.TCDTagantiseizureen
dc.subject.TCDTagchallenging behaviouren
dc.subject.TCDTagdrug safetyen
dc.subject.TCDTagepilepsy and intellectual disabilityen
dc.identifier.rssurihttps://authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S1525505021004522
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0002-7922-7691
dc.status.accessibleNen


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