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dc.contributor.authorLee, Catriona
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Neil
dc.contributor.authorDonne, Bernard
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-13T20:32:13Z
dc.date.available2021-07-13T20:32:13Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.date.submitted2021en
dc.identifier.citationLee, C., Fleming, N., Donne, B., Comparison of balance variables across active and retired athletes and age matched controls, International Journal of Exercise Science, 2021 Apr 1;14(3):76-92en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/96746
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractPostural control is a major falls risk factor, therefore identifying protective mechanisms is essential. Physical activity enhances postural stability but effect duration has been minimally researched. The current study investigated if prolonged early life training exposure protected neuromuscular balance processes later in life. Static and dynamic balance variables were assessed in 77 healthy adults. Two age ranges (18 - 35yr, young; > 50yr, retired) were divided into weight bearing athlete and control groups; young athlete (YA), young control (YC), retired athlete (RA) and retired control (RC). Static balance was quantified using force platform derived sway velocity (mm.s-1) and C90area (mm2) data (stable and unstable surfaces, eyes open and closed) Dynamic balance was assessed using the Y balance test (YBT). Results demonstrated significant age effect across groups. However, an athletic effect was evident only assessing dynamic balance and static time to error variables. Mean time to error data (YA, 27.8 ± 5.8; YC, 20.5 ± 11.1; RA, 9.4 ± 8.5; RC, 8.6 ± 9.1 s) recorded significant age and athletic effects for the most challenging condition completed (single leg stance, eyes closed, stable surface). Mean maximum YBT composite score (YA, 90.0 ± 5.4%; YC, 83.6 ± 6.5%; RA, 80.8 ± 10.7%; RC, 72.4 ± 15.5%) demonstrated an age effect, and also identified a group effect in the retired cohorts. The current study supports research highlighting declined balance with ageing. Overall, former athleticism did not significantly enhance static balance in later life. Dynamic balance incorporates muscle strength possibly inferring a protective role in former athletes.en
dc.format.extent76en
dc.format.extent92en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational Journal of Exercise Science;
dc.relation.ispartofseries14;
dc.relation.ispartofseries3;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectC90 areaen
dc.subjectSway velocityen
dc.subjectBalance assessmenten
dc.subjectBalance platformen
dc.subjectFalls preventionen
dc.subjectRetired athletesen
dc.titleComparison of balance variables across active and retired athletes and age matched controlsen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/nflemin
dc.identifier.rssinternalid232113
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeAgeingen
dc.subject.TCDThemeNeuroscienceen
dc.identifier.rssurihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8136550/
dc.subject.darat_impairmentAge-related disabilityen
dc.subject.darat_impairmentMobility impairmenten
dc.subject.darat_thematicHealthen
dc.subject.darat_thematicSportsen
dc.status.accessibleNen


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