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dc.contributor.authorO'Halloran, Aisling
dc.contributor.authorScarlett, Siobhan
dc.contributor.authorKenny, Rose
dc.contributor.authorRomero-Ortuno, Roman
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-15T16:09:57Z
dc.date.available2021-05-15T16:09:57Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.date.submitted2019en
dc.identifier.citationRomero-Ortuno R, Scarlett S, O'Halloran AM, Kenny RA. Is phenotypical prefrailty all the same? A longitudinal investigation of two prefrailty subtypes in TILDA, Age and Ageing, 2019 Dec 1;49(1):39-45en
dc.identifier.issn0002-0729
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/96319
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractBackground: Fried's frailty phenotype is defined by five criteria: exhaustion, unexplained weight loss, weakness, slowness and low physical activity. Prefrailty (PF) meets one or two criteria. PF is of interest as a target for preventative interventions, but it is not known if it is a homogenous syndrome. Objective: to compare the longitudinal trajectories of two PF groups: one defined by exhaustion and/or unexplained weight loss (PF1) and one defined by one or two of the following: weakness, slowness, low physical activity (PF2). Design and setting: population-based longitudinal study of ageing. Subjects: One-thousand four-hundred seventy-six PF participants aged ≥50 years from wave 1 of the study (2010), followed 2-yearly over four longitudinal waves (2012, 2014, 2016, 2018). Methods: generalised estimating equations (GEEs) were used to assess the effect of PF type across waves to predict cumulative mortality and disability in basic activities of daily living (ADL) and independent ADL (IADL), adjusting for baseline characteristics (age, sex, education, living alone, self-rated health, comorbidity, body mass index). Results: in wave 1, there were 503 PF1 and 973 PF2 participants. By wave 5, 38 (7.6%) PF1 and 145 (14.9%) PF2 participants had died. In PF1 participants, mean numbers of ADL and IADL disabilities both increased from 0.1 to 0.2 from wave 1 to wave 5, whilst in PF2 increases were from 0.2 to 0.5. Adjusted GEE models suggested significantly divergent trajectories of IADL disability by wave 2, ADL disability by wave 3 and mortality by wave 3. Conclusion: PF may not be a homogenous biological syndrome.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAge and ageing;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjecthomogenous biological syndromeen
dc.subjectFried’s frailty phenotypeen
dc.subjectgeneralised estimating equations (GEEs)en
dc.subjectDisabilityen
dc.subjectFrailtyen
dc.subjectLongitudinal studiesen
dc.subjectMortalityen
dc.subjectOlder peopleen
dc.subjectPhenotypeen
dc.titleIs phenotypical prefrailty all the same? A longitudinal investigation of two prefrailty subtypes in TILDAen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/romeroor
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/rkenny
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/sscarlet
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/aiohallo
dc.identifier.rssinternalid210592
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afz129
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeAgeingen
dc.subject.TCDTagAGEINGen
dc.subject.TCDTagDISABILITYen
dc.subject.TCDTagFrailtyen
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0002-3882-7447


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