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dc.contributor.authorHarper, Carla
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-13T10:03:36Z
dc.date.available2021-05-13T10:03:36Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationHieger, T.J., Serbet, R., Harper, C.J., Taylor, T.N., Taylor, E.L., Gulbranson, E.L., Cheirolepidiaceous diversity: an anatomically preserved pollen cone from the Lower Jurassic of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 2015, 220, 78 - 87en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/96280
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractTo date, the vast majority of fossils described for the extinct conifer family, the Cheirolepidiaceae, have been reported from compression/impressions primarily from Cretaceous rocks; there are fewer reports from permineralizations and the Jurassic. New specimens have recently been discovered in siliceous blocks composed of fusainized layers of plant remains that alternate with fine-grained sediments from the Carapace Nunatak (Lower Jurassic) locality of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Specimens were prepared using standard serial cellulose-acetate peel technique, transmitted-light microscopy, and SEM analysis. The cones are ellipsoidal, up to 5.5 mm long, and consist of helically arranged microsporophylls, each with a slender stalk containing a single vascular bundle; the distal lamina is peltate and most closely resembles those of the Classostrobus. Four to seven pollen sacs are arranged in an annular cluster abaxial to the sporophyll stalk. In situ Classopollis pollen ranges from 18 to 60 μm in equatorial diameter with an average diameter of 30 μm. In addition to these well-preserved pollen cones there is a large diversity of vegetative conifer remains within the Carapace Nunatak material including leaf and stem fragments. The discovery of the pollen cones in combination with vegetative remains provides additional information on the reproductive biology of the Cheirolepidiaceae and increases the probability of developing a whole-plant concept for this Jurassic permineralized conifer.en
dc.format.extent78en
dc.format.extent87en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesReview of Palaeobotany and Palynology;
dc.relation.ispartofseries220;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectConiferen
dc.subjectPermineralizationen
dc.subjectClassopollisen
dc.subjectClassostrobusen
dc.subjectVolcanic environmenten
dc.subjectCarapace Nunataken
dc.titleCheirolepidiaceous diversity: an anatomically preserved pollen cone from the Lower Jurassic of southern Victoria Land, Antarcticaen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/charper
dc.identifier.rssinternalid225664
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.revpalbo.2015.05.003
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeSmart & Sustainable Planeten
dc.subject.TCDTagANTARCTICAen
dc.subject.TCDTagCONESen
dc.subject.TCDTagCheirolepidiaceaeen
dc.subject.TCDTagConiferen
dc.subject.TCDTagFOSSILen
dc.subject.TCDTagFossil Fungien
dc.subject.TCDTagFossil pollenen
dc.subject.TCDTagJURASSICen
dc.subject.TCDTagPLANT MACROFOSSILSen
dc.identifier.rssurihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0034666715000925
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0002-3710-2137
dc.status.accessibleNen


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