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dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Conoren
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-10T11:54:47Z
dc.date.available2021-03-10T11:54:47Z
dc.date.issued2021en
dc.date.submitted2021en
dc.identifier.citationMcDonnell, Emily E., Buckley, Conor T., Investigating the physiological relevance of ex vivo disc organ culture nutrient microenvironments using in silico modeling and experimental validation, JOR SPINE, 2021en
dc.identifier.issn2572-1143en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/95633
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractBackground: Ex vivo disc organ culture systems have become a valuable tool for the development and pre‐clinical testing of potential intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration strategies. Bovine caudal discs have been widely selected due to their large availability and comparability to human IVDs in terms of size and biochemical composition. However, despite their extensive use, it remains to be elucidated whether their nutrient microenvironment is comparable to human degeneration. Aims: This work aims to create the first experimentally validated in silico model which can be used to predict and characterize the metabolite concentrations within ex vivo culture systems. Materials & Methods: Finite element models of cultured discs governed by previously established coupled reaction‐diffusion equations were created using COMSOL Multiphysics. Experimental validation was performed by measuring oxygen, glucose and pH levels within discs cultured for 7 days, in a static compression bioreactor. Results: The in silico model was successfully validated through good agreement between the predicted and experimentally measured concentrations. For an ex vivo organ cultured in high glucose medium (4.5 g/L or 25 mM) and normoxia, a larger bovine caudal disc (Cd1‐2 to Cd3‐4) had a central concentration of ~2.6 %O2, ~8 mM of glucose and a pH value of 6.7, while the smallest caudal discs investigated (Cd6‐7 and Cd7‐8), had a central concentration of ~6.5 %O2, ~12 mM of glucose and a pH value of 6.9. Discussion: This work advances the knowledge of ex vivo disc culture microenvironments and highlights a critical need for optimization and standardization of culturing conditions. Conclusion: Ultimately, for assessment of cell‐based therapies and successful clinical translation based on nutritional demands, it is imperative that the critical metabolite values within organ cultures (minimum glucose, oxygen and pH values) are physiologically relevant and comparable to the stages of human degeneration.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJOR SPINEen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectDegenerationen
dc.subjectIntervertebral discen
dc.subjectOxygenen
dc.subjectGlucoseen
dc.subjectpHen
dc.subjectMetabolismen
dc.titleInvestigating the physiological relevance of ex vivo disc organ culture nutrient microenvironments using in silico modeling and experimental validationen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/cbuckleen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid225285en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsp2.1141en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0001-7452-4534en


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