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dc.contributor.authorRomero-Ortuno, Roman
dc.contributor.authorHartley, Peter
dc.contributor.authorDeWitt, Amanda L.
dc.contributor.authorForsyth, Faye
dc.contributor.authorDeaton, Christi
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-02T10:27:25Z
dc.date.available2020-06-02T10:27:25Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.date.submitted2020en
dc.identifier.citationHartley, P., Dewitt, A.L., Forsyth, F., Romero-Ortuno, R. & Deaton, C,. Predictors of physical activity in older adults early in an emergency hospital admission: a prospective cohort study, BMC Geriatrics, 2020en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttps://bmcgeriatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12877-020-01562-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/92708
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractBackground: Reduced mobility may be responsible for functional decline and acute sarcopenia in older hospitalised patients. The drivers of reduced in-hospital mobility are poorly understood, especially during the early phase of acute hospitalisation. We investigated predictors of in-hospital activity during a 24-h period in the first 48 h of hospital admission in older adults. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of a prospective repeated measures cohort study. Participants aged 75 years or older were recruited within the first 24 h of admission. At recruitment, patients underwent a baseline assessment including measurements of pre-morbid functional mobility, cognition, frailty, falls efficacy, co-morbidity, acute illness severity, knee extension strength and grip strength, and consented to wear accelerometers to measure physical activity during the first 7 days (or until discharge if earlier). In-hospital physical activity was defined as the amount of upright time (standing or walking). To examine the predictors of physical activity, we limited the analysis to the first 24 h of recording to maximise the sample size as due to discharge from hospital there was daily attrition. We used a best subset analysis including all baseline measures. The optimal model was defined by having the lowest Bayesian information criterion in the best-subset analyses. The model specified a maximum of 5 covariates and used an exhaustive search. Results: Seventy participants were recruited but eight were excluded from the final analysis due to lack of accelerometer data within the first 24 h after recruitment. Patients spent a median of 0.50 h (IQR: 0.21; 1.43) standing or walking. The optimal model selected the following covariates: functional mobility as measured by the de Morton Mobility Index and two measures of illness severity, the National Early Warning Score, and serum C-reactive protein. Conclusions: Physical activity, particularly in the acute phase of hospitalisation, is very low in older adults. The association between illness severity and physical activity may be explained by symptoms of acute illness being barriers to activity. Interdisciplinary approaches are required to identify early mobilisation opportunities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBMC Geriatrics;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectHospitalen
dc.subjectPhysical activityen
dc.subjectAccelerometersen
dc.subjectFunctional mobilityen
dc.subjectIllness severityen
dc.titlePredictors of physical activity in older adults early in an emergency hospital admission: a prospective cohort studyen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience Foundation Ireland (SFI)en
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/romeroor
dc.identifier.rssinternalid215954
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-020-01562-3
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber18/FRL/6188en
dc.subject.TCDThemeAgeingen
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0002-3882-7447
dc.subject.darat_thematicHealthen
dc.status.accessibleNen


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