Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDuffy, Seanen
dc.contributor.authorMULHAIRE, RONAN JOSPEHen
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-14T16:44:40Z
dc.date.available2020-05-14T16:44:40Z
dc.date.issued2020en
dc.date.submitted2020en
dc.identifier.citationMULHAIRE, RONAN JOSPEH, Kingship, lordship, and resistance: a study of power in eleventh- and twelfth-century Ireland, Trinity College Dublin.School of Histories & Humanities, 2020en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/92542
dc.descriptionAPPROVEDen
dc.description.abstractThis thesis starts from the premise that historians of medieval Ireland have interpreted 'power' in a very narrow way. Engagement with the rich corpus of international literature on power reveals the sheer complexity and vicissitudes of 'power' as a concept, and forms the launching-pad for the thesis as a whole. From there, the broader issue of resistance is discussed, in particular the phenomena of regicide and revolt - how did resistance manifest itself, and in particular violent resistance? It is suggested that we actually see a decline in the number of regicides between the battle of Clontarf and the English invasion. Connected is the position of non-royal lordship. It has commonly been argued that petty kings were being downgraded to mere 'lords'. This thesis argues that there is no sound evidential basis for this oft-propounded trope, and therefore a posited decline in regicides cannot be explained away by this old argument. The thesis argues that the relationship between non-royal lords and their social inferiors is being reconfigured; a new interpretation is put forward for the emergence of 'baile', and it is likely significant that this coincides with the upsurge in references to 'lords' in the chronicles. Finally, the little-studied phenomenon of revolt is explored at two levels - revolts against the rule of an individual king, and what we might term 'popular' revolts. As regards the first level, much of the discussion revolves around revolts denoted in the annals by the verbal-noun imp?d. It argues that the adoption of a new term, coupled with the decline in regicides over time suggests two things: that patterns of resistance were changing in the century and a half between Clontarf and the invasion, and that the ways in which resistance were being thought about was also evolving. As regards social antagonisms and the like, chapter four concludes that patterns of popular unrest in pre-invasion Ireland bore remarkable similarity to elsewhere in Europe in this period.en
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublin. School of Histories & Humanities. Discipline of Historyen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectEleventh centuryen
dc.subjectTwelfth centuryen
dc.subjectPoweren
dc.subjectKingshipen
dc.subjectLordshipen
dc.subjectResistanceen
dc.subjectRevolten
dc.subjectMedieval Irelanden
dc.subjectRegicideen
dc.subjectBaileen
dc.subjectHigh-kingshipen
dc.subjectImperatoren
dc.subjectViolenceen
dc.titleKingship, lordship, and resistance: a study of power in eleventh- and twelfth-century Irelanden
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.sponsorIrish Research Council (IRC)en
dc.relation.referencesPierre Bourdieu, Masculine domination (Cambridge, 2001), p. 35en
dc.relation.referencesCharles Tilly, 'Domination, resistance, compliance...discourse', Sociological Forum 6(3) (1991), p. 601en
dc.relation.referencesSean Duffy, Ireland in the middle ages (Basingstoke, 1997), p. 16en
dc.relation.referencesKatharine Megan McGowan, Political geography and political structures in earlier mediaeval Ireland: a chronicle-based approach, Unpublished PhD thesis (Cambridge, 2002), p. 19en
dc.relation.referencesSean Duffy, Brian Boru and the Battle of Clontarf (Dublin, 2013), p. 143en
dc.relation.referencesKuno Meyer (ed. & trans.), Betha Colm?in Maic L?ach?in: Life of Colm?n son of L?achan (Felinfach, 1997), pp 76, 77en
dc.relation.referencesGregory Toner, 'Baile: settlements and landholding in medieval Ireland', ?igse 34 (2004), p. 38en
dc.relation.referencesNorbert Elias, The civilizing process (1939; revised edn; Oxford, 2000), p. 399, 383, 386-7, 389, 193en
dc.relation.referencesSean Duffy, 'Pre-Norman Dublin: a capital of Ireland?', History Ireland 1 (4) (1993), p. 18en
dc.relation.referencesJ.H. Todd, Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh. The war of the Gaedhil with the Gaill (London, 1867), pp 158-9en
dc.relation.referencesRobert Atkinson (ed.), The passions and homilies from Leabhar Breac: text, translation, and glossary (Dublin, 1887), pp 158, 408-9en
dc.relation.referencesChris Wickham, 'Gossip and resistance among the medieval peasantry', Past and Present 160 (1998), p. 20en
dc.relation.referencesSteven Lukes, Power: a radical view (Basingstoke, 2005; second edn.), p. 28, p. 29en
dc.relation.referencesDauvit Broun, 'Statehood and lordship inen
dc.relation.referencesH.J. Higham, An English empire. Bede and the Anglo-Saxon kings (Manchester, 1995), p. 63.en
dc.relation.referencesCharles Plummer (ed.), 'Vita sancti Maedoc episcopi de Ferna' in Vitae sanctorum Hiberniae volume II (Dublin, 1997; latest edn.), p. 155en
dc.relation.referencesKevin Murray, 'The dating of Branwen: theen
dc.relation.referencesRobin Chapman Stacey, Dark speech. The performance of law in early Ireland (Philadelphia, PA, 2007), p. 106en
dc.relation.referencesPaul MacCotter, Medieval Ireland: territorial, political and economic divisions (Dublin, 2008), pp 97-8en
dc.relation.referencesF.J. Byrne, 'Ireland and her neighbours, c. 1014 - c. 1072', in D?ibh? ? Cr?in?n (ed.), A new history of Ireland volume I. Prehistoric and early Ireland (Oxford, 2005), p. 862.en
dc.relation.referencesDenis Casey, 'A reconsideration of the authorship and transmission of Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh', PRIA 113C (2013), p. 137en
dc.relation.referencesSusan Reynolds, Fiefs and vassals: the medieval evidence reinterpreted (Oxford, 1994), p. 47en
dc.relation.referencesRalph O'Connor, 'Searching for the moral in Bruiden Meic Da R?o', ?riu (2006), p. 128en
dc.relation.referencesStephen D. White, 'Alternate constructions of treason in the Angevin political world: traison in the History of William Marshal', e-Spania 4 Dec. 2007en
dc.relation.referencesJoan Newlon Radner (ed. & trans.), Fragmentary Annals of Ireland (Dublin, 1978)en
dc.relation.referencesMichel Foucault, 'Two lectures' in Colin Gordon (ed.), Power/knowledge: selected interviews and other writings, 1972-1977 (New York, 1980), p, 98en
dc.relation.referencesS. Connolly & J.M. Picard (eds & trans), 'Cogitosus: Life of Saint Brigit', JRSAI 117 (1987), p. 24en
dc.relation.referencesN.B. Aitchison, 'Kingship, society, and sacrality: rank, power, and ideology in early medieval Ireland', Traditio 49 (1994), p. 73en
dc.relation.referencesDenis Casey, Studies in the exercise of royal power in Ireland, c. 650- c. 1200 AD Unpublished PhD thesis (Cambridge, 2009), pp 12-13en
dc.relation.referencesF.J. Byrne, Irish kings and high-kings (Dublin, 1973; reprinted 2001), pp 2-3en
dc.relation.referencesJames C. Scott, Domination and the arts of resistance: hidden transcripts (London, 1990), p. xii, p. 197, p. 199en
dc.relation.referencesT.M. Charles-Edwards, Early Irish and Welsh kinship (Oxford, 1993), p. 348en
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttps://tcdlocalportal.tcd.ie/pls/EnterApex/f?p=800:71:0::::P71_USERNAME:MULHAIRRen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid216249en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record