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dc.contributor.authorQuirke, Amy
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-25T18:59:19Z
dc.date.available2020-03-25T18:59:19Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.citationAmy Quirke, 'Challenges facing multi-grade teachers supporting children with SEN', [Thesis], 2019-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/91878
dc.descriptionProfessional Masters of Educationen
dc.description.abstractBackground: Given the nationwide prevalence of multi-grade classrooms and the international trend towards inclusion education, limited research has been conducted in relation to children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) in a multi-grade classroom in an Irish context. The international move towards inclusion is rooted in legislation in Ireland, giving children with SEN a legal footing when trying to obtain an inclusive education. This study examines the provision of an inclusion education from a teacher’s perspective, discussing the barriers, training and challenges as perceived by multi-grade teachers. Methods: Qualitative methods were used to gain perspectives from practicing teachers regarding their attitudes towards inclusion, training and barriers that may exist. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight practicing teachers. These interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Results: The findings suggest that the lack of an internationally accepted definition of inclusive education is problematic, for policymakers, teachers and individual children. Changes in support allocation for schools in Ireland is a move in a positive direction, but this research finds some issues that may be problematic in the future regarding the assessment of children. Special needs assistants (SNA) support and its’ role in the context of an inclusive education was divisive in this study. Research from the UK suggests the role of teaching assistants has a negative effect on student outcomes and this needs to be considered in an Irish context. Challenges facing multi-grade teachers supporting children with SEN. Conclusion: An increase in the provision of training, both during their initial teacher education and continuous professional development for multi-grade teachers is needed in Ireland. The lack of diversity in Irish staffroom’s is also potentially problematic, and a shift in the routes of entry to primary teaching may be required in Ireland. Further research is needed in the area of SNA support, inclusive practices and diversity in Irish classrooms.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCESen
dc.titleChallenges facing multi-grade teachers supporting children with SENen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsembargoedAccess
dc.date.ecembargoEndDate2020-04-01


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