Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBarrett, James
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-21T10:09:55Z
dc.date.available2020-03-21T10:09:55Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.date.submitted2020en
dc.identifier.citationJames H. Barrett, Sanne Boessenkool, Catherine J. Kneale, Tamsin C. O’Connell, Bastiaan Star, 'Ecological globalisation, serial depletion and the medieval trade of walrus rostra', 2020, Quaternary Science Reviews;, 229;en
dc.identifier.issn02773791
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/91845
dc.descriptionPUBLISHED [GOLD]en
dc.description.abstractThe impacts of early ecological globalisation may have had profound economic and environmental consequences for human settlements and animal populations. Here, we review the extent of such historical impacts by investigating the medieval trade of walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) ivory. We use an interdisciplinary approach including chaîne opératoire, ancient DNA (aDNA), stable isotope and zooarchaeological analysis of walrus rostra (skull sections) to identify their biological source and sub- sequent trade through Indigenous and urban networks. This approach complements and improves the spatial resolution of earlier aDNA observations, and we conclude that almost all medieval European finds of walrus rostra likely derived from Greenland. We further find that shifting urban nodes redistributed the traded ivory and that the latest medieval rostra finds were from smaller, often female, walruses of a distinctive DNA clade, which is especially prevalent in northern Greenland. Our results suggest that more and smaller animals were targeted at increasingly untenable distances, which reflects a classic pattern of resource depletion. We consider how the trade of walrus and elephant ivory intersected, and evaluate the extent to which emergent globalisation and the “resource curse” contributed to the abandonment of Norse Greenland.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Leverhulme Trust [MRF-2013-065], United Kingdom; Nansenfondet and the Research Council of Norway [projects 262777 and 230821], Norway.en
dc.format.extent106en
dc.format.extent122en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesQuaternary Science Reviews;
dc.relation.ispartofseries229;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectEuropeen
dc.subjectGreenlanden
dc.subjectEcological globalisationen
dc.subjectHistorical ecologyen
dc.subjectArchaeologyen
dc.subjectStable isotopesen
dc.subjectAncient DNAen
dc.subjectMiddle Agesen
dc.titleEcological globalisation, serial depletion and the medieval trade of walrus rostraen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorLeverhulme Trusten
dc.contributor.sponsorNansenfondet and the Research Council of Norwayen
dc.contributor.sponsorNansenfondet and the Research Council of Norwayen
dc.relation.referencesReferencesen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/barretjh
dc.identifier.rssinternalid215022
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2019.106122
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberMRF-2013-065en
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber262777en
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumber230821en
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2019.106122.en
dc.subject.TCDThemeSmart & Sustainable Planeten


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record