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dc.contributor.authorKelly, Danielen
dc.contributor.authorLally, Caitrionaen
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-10T16:15:27Z
dc.date.available2020-01-10T16:15:27Z
dc.date.issued2019en
dc.date.submitted2019en
dc.identifier.citationSchipani, R. and Nolan, D.R. and Lally, C. and Kelly, D.J., Integrating finite element modelling and 3D printing to engineer biomimetic polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering, Connective Tissue Research, 2019en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03008207.2019.1656720
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/91293
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.descriptioncited By 0en
dc.description.abstractThe suitability of a scaffold for tissue engineering is determined by a number of interrelated factors. The biomaterial should be biocompatible and cell instructive, with a porosity and pore interconnectivity that facilitates cellular migration and the transport of nutrients and waste products into and out of the scaffolds. For the engineering of load bearing tissues, the scaffold may also be required to possess specific mechanical properties and/or ensure the transfer of mechanical stimuli to cells to direct their differentiation. Achieving these design goals is challenging, but could potentially be realised by integrating computational tools such as finite element (FE) modelling with three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques to assess how scaffold architecture and material properties influence the performance of the implant. In this study we first use Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) to modulate the architecture of polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds, exploring the influence of varying fibre diameter, spacing and laydown pattern on the structural and mechanical properties of such scaffolds. We next demonstrate that a simple FE modelling strategy, which captures key aspects of the printed scaffold’s actual geometry and material behaviour, can be used to accurately model the mechanical characteristics of such scaffolds. We then show the utility of this strategy by using FE modelling to help design 3D printed scaffolds with mechanical properties mimicking that of articular cartilage. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that a relatively simple FE modelling approach can be used to inform the design of 3D printed scaffolds to ensure their bulk mechanical properties mimic specific target tissues.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesConnective Tissue Researchen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectThree-dimensional printingen
dc.subject3D printingen
dc.subjectScaffold designen
dc.subjectFinite element modellingen
dc.subjectMechanical propertiesen
dc.subjectTissue engineeringen
dc.titleIntegrating finite element modelling and 3D printing to engineer biomimetic polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineeringen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/kellyd9en
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/lallycaen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid209756en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03008207.2019.1656720en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0003-4091-0992en


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