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dc.contributor.authorLacey, Gerard
dc.contributor.authorShowstark, Mary
dc.contributor.authorVan Rhee, James
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-04T11:48:32Z
dc.date.available2019-10-04T11:48:32Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.date.submitted2019en
dc.identifier.citationLacey, G., Showstark, M. & Van Rhee, J. Training to Proficiency in the WHO Hand Hygiene Technique, Journal of medical education and curricular development, 6, 2019en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2382120519867681
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/89607
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Hand hygiene is critical to patient safety, but low performance in terms of the quantity and quality of hand hygiene is often reported. Training-to-proficiency is common for other clinical skills, but no proficiency-based training program for hand hygiene has been reported in the literature. This study developed a proficiency-based training program to improve hand hygiene quality in line with World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines and assessed the amount of training required to reach proficiency. The training was delivered as part of a 5-day induction for students on the Physician Assistant online program. Methods: A total of 42 students used a simulator to objectively measure hand hygiene technique over a 5-day period. Proficiency was achieved when students demonstrated all 6 steps of the WHO technique in less than 42 seconds. The students also completed a postintervention questionnaire. Results: The average training episode lasted 2.5 minutes and consisted of 4.5 hand hygiene exercises. The average student completed 5 training episodes (1 per day) taking a total of 17 minutes. A total of 40% (17) of the students achieved proficiency within the 5 days. Proficiency was strongly correlated with the number of training exercises completed (r = 0.79, P < .001) and the total time spent training (r = 0.75, P < .001). Linear regression predicted that the 32 hand hygiene exercises or a total of 23-minute training were required to achieve proficiency. Conclusions: This is the first study to develop a train-to-proficiency program for hand hygiene quality and estimate the amount of training required. Given the importance of hand hygiene quality to preventing health care–associated infections (HAIs), medical education programs should consider using proficiency-based training in hand hygiene technique.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of medical education and curricular development;
dc.relation.ispartofseries6;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectPsychomotor skillsen
dc.subjectSkill acquisitionen
dc.subjectTrainingen
dc.subjectObjective skills assessmenten
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectHand hygieneen
dc.titleTraining to Proficiency in the WHO Hand Hygiene Techniqueen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/gjlacey
dc.identifier.rssinternalid207478
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/2382120519867681
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeCreative Technologiesen
dc.subject.TCDThemeImmunology, Inflammation & Infectionen
dc.subject.TCDTagData Analysisen
dc.subject.TCDTagImaging and Computer Visionen
dc.subject.TCDTagInformation technology in educationen
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0002-1923-6852
dc.status.accessibleNen


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