Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Norahen
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-22T13:51:09Z
dc.date.available2019-08-22T13:51:09Z
dc.date.issued2019en
dc.date.submitted2019en
dc.identifier.citationNorah, Stephen Dunne and Paul E. Ennis, Immaterialism, Objects and Social Theory, Theory Culture and Society, 36, 3, 2019, 121 - 137en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/89291
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractThe philosopher Graham Harman argues that contemporary debates about the nature of reality as such, and about the nature of objects in particular, can be meaningfully applied to social theory and practice. With Immaterialism, he has recently provided a case-based demonstration of how this could happen. But social theorists have compelling reasons to oppose object-oriented social theory’s 15 principles. Fidelity to Harman’s aesthetic foundationalism, and his particular use of serial endosymbiosis theory as a mechanism of social change, constrain the very practices which it is supposed to enable. However, social theory stands to benefit from object oriented philosophy through what we call posthuman relationism – characterised as a commitment to the reality of the nonhuman, but not divorced from the human. The emphasis in object-oriented social theory on how objects withdraw from cognitive or affective capture and representation needs to be tempered by an equal focus on how objects appeal.en
dc.format.extent121en
dc.format.extent137en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTheory Culture and Societyen
dc.relation.ispartofseries36en
dc.relation.ispartofseries3en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectGraham Harmanen
dc.subjectObject-oriented social theoryen
dc.subjectPosthuman relationismen
dc.subjectSymbiosisen
dc.titleImmaterialism, Objects and Social Theoryen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/ncampbeen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid206499en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeDigital Humanitiesen
dc.subject.TCDThemeIdentities in Transformationen
dc.identifier.rssurihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0263276418824638en
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0002-8563-6459en
dc.status.accessibleNen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record