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dc.contributor.advisorBradley, Danielen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T13:03:54Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T13:03:54Z
dc.date.issued2018en
dc.date.submitted2018en
dc.identifier.citationVERDUGO, MARTA ALEXANDRA, The Multilayered Prehistory of Wild Aurochs and Domestic Cattle, An Ancient Genomics Perspective, Trinity College Dublin.School of Genetics & Microbiology.GENETICS, 2018en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/82873
dc.descriptionAPPROVEDen
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores 122 ancient genomes of domestic cattle and wild aurochs to investigate past population events such as domestication and admixture. Population genomics of ancient taurine domestics from the ancient Near East and Europe support a centre of domestication in the Near East for Bos taurus. Subsequent dispersal of domestic cattle into Europe was followed by gene flow from European wild aurochs for thousands of years. Genome-wide data of 18 Bos primigenius samples from Asia, North Africa and Europe reveals new mtDNA and Y chromosome haplogroups, as well as support for gene flow with ancient domestics. Admixture between Bos taurus and Bos indicus in the Near East was confirmed by analysing 67 ancient domestic individuals across Western Asia, in a temporal context of 8000 years. Zebu cattle were likely introduced in the Near East first during the Bronze Age, with the expansion of Mesopotamian and Harappan civilizations, with gene flow occurring for thousands of years. It was also demonstrated the potential for low coverage aDNA data to infer on past population history and to fill in gaps in the genetic prehistory of wild and domestic cattle.en
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublin. School of Genetics & Microbiology. Discipline of Geneticsen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectaurochsen
dc.subjectdomesticationen
dc.subjectcattleen
dc.subjectancient DNAen
dc.subjectpopulation geneticsen
dc.subjectgenomicsen
dc.subjectZebuen
dc.subjectBos taurusen
dc.subjectBos indicusen
dc.subjectgeneticsen
dc.subjectBos primigeniusen
dc.subjectNear Easten
dc.subjecttaurineen
dc.titleThe Multilayered Prehistory of Wild Aurochs and Domestic Cattleen
dc.title.alternativeAn Ancient Genomics Perspectiveen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.sponsorEuropean Research Council (ERC)en
dc.relation.referencesDomestication is a sustained multigenerational, mutualistic relationship in which one organism assumes a significant degree of influence over the reproduction and care of another organism in order to secure a more predictable supply of a resource of interest, and through which the partner organism gains advantage over individuals that remain outside this relationship, thereby benefitting and often increasing the fitness of both the domesticator and the target domesticate.(Zeder 2015)en
dc.relation.referencesTheir strength and speed are extraordinary; they spare neither man nor wild beast which they have espied? But not even when taken very young can they be rendered familiar to men and tamed. Julius Caesaren
dc.relation.referencesMan selects only for his own good: Nature only for that of the being which she tends.(...)He often begins his selection by some half-monstrous form; or at least by some modification prominent enough to catch the eye or to be plainly useful to him. Charles Darwinen
dc.relation.referencesSecond hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack. Virginia Woolfen
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.type.qualificationlevelPostgraduate Doctoren
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/pereirmen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid187264en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.rights.EmbargoedAccessYen


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