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dc.contributor.advisorDonnelly, Alison
dc.contributor.authorDiskin, Eileen Burke
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-28T14:15:14Z
dc.date.available2017-02-28T14:15:14Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationEileen Burke Diskin, 'Pink is the new black : an investigation of antibiotic resistance in wild birds through use of a novel indicator, the Greater Flamingo', [thesis], Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). Department of Botany, 2014, pp 244
dc.identifier.otherTHESIS 10769
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/79571
dc.description.abstractAntibiotics have revolutionized human health care. Given their importance in treating infectious disease and the explosion in their use worldwide, the latter half of the 20th century is often described, within a medical context, as the era of antibiotics. In addition to their use in human healthcare, antibiotics are used in a variety of other contexts; for example, they have been widely used in an agricultural context to treat and prevent disease and promote growth in livestock. Resulting from the increased use of antibiotics is the emergence of antibiotic resistance - the ability of bacteria to survive exposure to antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance has been described by the World Heath Organization as one of the three greatest threats to human health. Initially recognised as a problem in urban environments, antibiotic resistance has now also been identified in a variety of wildlife species in environment systems worldwide. Wild birds are particularly important to consider as reservoirs (i.e. stores) of antibiotic resistant bacteria given their ability to transfer pathogens from one location to another through both short- and long- distance movements.
dc.format1 volume
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTrinity College (Dublin, Ireland). Department of Botany
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://stella.catalogue.tcd.ie/iii/encore/record/C__Rb16200333
dc.subjectBotany, Ph.D.
dc.subjectPh.D. Trinity College Dublin
dc.titlePink is the new black : an investigation of antibiotic resistance in wild birds through use of a novel indicator, the Greater Flamingo
dc.typethesis
dc.type.supercollectionthesis_dissertations
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publications
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.format.extentpaginationpp 244
dc.description.noteTARA (Trinity’s Access to Research Archive) has a robust takedown policy. Please contact us if you have any concerns: rssadmin@tcd.ie


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