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dc.contributor.authorBOND, URSULAen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-17T12:34:12Z
dc.date.available2017-01-17T12:34:12Z
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationKricka, W., Fitzpatrick, J., T.C. James and U. Bond, Engineering Saccharomyces pastorianus for the co-utilisation of xylose and cellulose from biomass., Microbial Cell Factories, 14, 61, 2015, 1-11en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/78783
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.descriptiondoi: 10.1186/s12934-015-0242-4.en
dc.description.abstractBackground Lignocellulosic biomass is a viable source of renewable energy for bioethanol production. For the efficient conversion of biomass into bioethanol, it is essential that sugars from both the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of lignocellulose be utilised. Results We describe the development of a recombinant yeast system for the fermentation of cellulose and xylose, the most abundant pentose sugar in the hemicellulose fraction of biomass. The brewer’s yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus was chosen as a host as significantly higher recombinant enzyme activities are achieved, when compared to the more commonly used S. cerevisiae. When expressed in S. pastorianus, the Trichoderma reesei xylose oxidoreductase pathway was more efficient at alcohol production from xylose than the xylose isomerase pathway. The alcohol yield was influenced by the concentration of xylose in the medium and was significantly improved by the additional expression of a gene encoding for xylulose kinase. The xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulose kinase genes were co-expressed with genes encoding for the three classes of T. reesei cellulases, namely endoglucanase (EG2), cellobiohydrolysase (CBH2) and β-glucosidase (BGL1). The initial metabolism of xylose by the engineered strains facilitated production of cellulases at fermentation temperatures. The sequential metabolism of xylose and cellulose generated an alcohol yield of 82% from the available sugars. Several different types of biomass, such as the energy crop Miscanthus sinensis and the industrial waste, brewer’s spent grains, were examined as biomass sources for fermentation using the developed yeast strains. Xylose metabolism and cell growth were inhibited in fermentations carried out with acid-treated spent grain liquor, resulting in a 30% reduction in alcohol yield compared to fermentations carried out with mixed sugar substrates. Conclusions Reconstitution of complete enzymatic pathways for cellulose hydrolysis and xylose utilisation in S. pastorianus facilitates the co-fermentation of cellulose and xylose without the need for added exogenous cellulases and provides a basis for the development of a consolidated process for co-utilisation of hemicellulose and cellulose sugars.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWK was supported by an Innovation Research Grant awarded by Trinity College Dublin.en
dc.format.extent1-11en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMicrobial Cell Factoriesen
dc.relation.ispartofseries14en
dc.relation.ispartofseries61en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectS. pastorianus Co-utilisation of xylose and cellulose Biomass Spent grain fermentationsen
dc.subject.lcshS. pastorianus Co-utilisation of xylose and cellulose Biomass Spent grain fermentationsen
dc.titleEngineering Saccharomyces pastorianus for the co-utilisation of xylose and cellulose from biomass.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/ubonden
dc.identifier.rssinternalid99619en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12934-015-0242-4en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeGenes & Societyen
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0003-2877-6460en


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