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dc.contributor.authorSamuels, Arthur W.
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-14T11:51:29Z
dc.date.available2007-04-14T11:51:29Z
dc.date.issued1896
dc.identifier.citationSamuels, Arthur W. 'A suggestion for the removal of taxes on litigation in Ireland as a condition of the reduction of the judicial establishment'. - Dublin: Journal of the Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Ireland,Vol. X Part LXXVI, 1895/1896, pp135-143en
dc.identifier.issn00814776
dc.identifier.otherJEL K41
dc.identifier.otherJEL K34
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/7840
dc.descriptionRead Friday, 7th February, 1896en
dc.description.abstractThe rumour that the Treasury officials have determined to promote a Bill for the reduction of the judicial staff in Ireland has been gaining consistency. A general claque of approbation of the proposal has been raised by the English Press, and the Government is urged to auspicate its proceedings by depriving this country of an expenditure of #20,000 a year for the benefit of the Imperial Exchequer. I do not in this paper propose to argue the question of the expediency of the proposed reduction, nor to consider whether it is an opportune time for statesmen, apart from Treasury officials, to choose for the purpose of further curtailing the numbers of the Judiciary which was established, after prolonged debate and consideration in Parliament, in the year 1877. During the eighteen years since the Judicature Act, Ireland has experienced a social revolution, a deep commercial depression, and an agrarian war. Whether time ought to be given for confidence to revive, and business to recover, before her legal establishment is further docked, is not, however, a matter which I intend to now discuss. My object in writing this paper is to urge that, if the proposed reduction in the judicial staff is made, in obedience to the Little Ireland class of politicians, the Irish public should insist that what is called a legal reform by the Treasury shall be a legal reform in reality, and that if the Treasury demands that the administration of the law shall be cheapened, the public should demand that the law to be administered shall also be cheapened. I contend that if expenditure in Ireland is to be reduced by cutting down the number of the judges, taxation in Ireland shall also be reduced by cutting down the suitors' fees; and that if Irish litigants are to be exposed to delay on acount of the diminution of the staff to hear their causes, they shall be compensated for it by the abolition of the Crown duties levied on those causes.en
dc.format.extent549866 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherStatistical and Social Inquiry Society of Irelanden
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of The Statistical and Social Inquiry Society of Irelanden
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVol. X Part LXXVI 1895/1896en
dc.relation.haspartVol. [No.], [Year]en
dc.source.urihttp://www.ssisi.ie
dc.subjectJudicial systemen
dc.subjectTaxationen
dc.subjectJudiciaryen
dc.subject.ddc314.15
dc.titleA suggestion for the removal of taxes on litigation in Ireland as a condition of the reduction of the judicial establishmenten
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.status.refereedYes


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