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dc.contributor.authorFEARON, PAULen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T14:42:19Z
dc.date.available2016-01-08T14:42:19Z
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.date.submitted2014en
dc.identifier.citationFisher HL, McGuffin P, Boydell J, Fearon P, Craig TK, Dazzan P, Morgan K, Doody GA, Jones PB, Leff J, Murray RM, Morgan C., Interplay Between Childhood Physical Abuse and Familial Risk in the Onset of Psychotic Disorders., Schizophrenia Bulletin, 40, 6, 2014, 1443 - 1451en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/75535
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractBackground : Childhood abuse is considered one of the main environmental risk factors for the development of psychotic symptoms and disorders. However, this association could be due to genetic factors influencing exposure to such risky environments or increasing sensitivity to the detrimental impact of abuse. Therefore, using a large epidemiologi - cal case-control sample, we explored the interplay between a specific form of childhood abuse and family psychiatric history (a proxy for genetic risk) in the onset of psycho - sis. Methods : Data were available on 172 first presentation psychosis cases and 246 geographically matched controls from the Aetiology and Ethnicity of Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses study. Information on childhood abuse was obtained retrospectively using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire and occurrence of psychotic and affective disorders in first degree relatives with the Family Interview for Genetic Studies. Results : Parental psy - chosis was more common among psychosis cases than unaf - fected controls (adjusted OR = 5.96, 95% CI: 2.09–17.01, P = .001). Parental psychosis was also associated with phys - ical abuse from mothers in both cases (OR = 3.64, 95% CI: 1.06–12.51, P = .040) and controls (OR = 10.93, 95% CI: 1.03–115.90, P = .047), indicative of a gene-environment correlation. Nevertheless, adjusting for parental psychosis did not measurably impact on the abuse-psychosis associa - tion (adjusted OR = 3.31, 95% CI: 1.22–8.95, P = .018). No interactions were found between familial liability and maternal physical abuse in determining psychosis caseness. Conclusions : This study found no evidence that familial risk accounts for associations between childhood physical abuse and psychotic disorder nor that it substantially increases the odds of psychosis among individuals reporting abuseen
dc.format.extent1443en
dc.format.extent1451en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSchizophrenia Bulletinen
dc.relation.ispartofseries40en
dc.relation.ispartofseries6en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectChildhood abuseen
dc.titleInterplay Between Childhood Physical Abuse and Familial Risk in the Onset of Psychotic Disorders.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorMedical Research Council (MRC)en
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/pfearonen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid100182en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeNeuroscienceen
dc.subject.TCDTagEpidemiologyen


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