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dc.contributor.authorColavita, Paulaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-17T11:39:10Z
dc.date.available2015-09-17T11:39:10Z
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationMetz, K.M.; Sanders, S.E.; Pender, J.P.; Dix, M.R; Hinds, D.T.; Quinn, S.J.; Ward, A.D.; Duffy P.; Cullen, R.J.; Colavita, P.E., Green Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles via Natural Extracts: The Biogenic Nanoparticle Corona and Its Effects on Reactivity, ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, 3, 7, 2015, 1610 - 1617en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/74600
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractThe optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have attracted significant attention for applications in a wide variety of fields, thus prompting interest in developing sustainable synthetic strategies that leverage the redox properties of natural compounds or extracts. Here, we investigate the surface chemistry of nanoparticles synthesized using coffee as a biogenic reductant. Building on our previously developed synthetic protocols for the preparation of silver and palladium nanoparticle/carbon composite microspheres a combination of thermogravimetric and spectroscopic methods were used to characterize the carbon microsphere and nanoparticle surfaces. Infrared reflectance spectroscopy and single particle surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize Pd and Ag metal surfaces, respectively, following synthesis. Strongly adsorbed organic layers were found to be present at metal nanoparticle surfaces after synthesis. The catalytic activity of Pd nanoparticles in hydrogenation reactions were leveraged to study the availability of surface sites, and coffee-synthesized nanomaterials were compared to commercial Pd-based hydrogenation catalysts. Our results demonstrate that biogenic adsorbates block catalytic surface sites and affect nanoparticle functionality. These findings highlight the need for careful analysis of surface chemistry as it relates to the specific applications of nanomaterials produced using greener or more sustainable methods.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a grant from the Hewlett Mellon Fund for Faculty Development at Albion College (Michigan, USA). We are grateful to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ireland for financial support of this work through grant 2008-PhD-WRM-2. SERS work was carried out at the Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, supported through LSF Ref. No. 1192000. The authors are thankful to Dr. Clifford Harris at Albion College for his insightful suggestions.en
dc.format.extent1610en
dc.format.extent1617en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineeringen
dc.relation.ispartofseries3en
dc.relation.ispartofseries7en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectmetal nanoparticlesen
dc.subject.lcshmetal nanoparticlesen
dc.titleGreen Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles via Natural Extracts: The Biogenic Nanoparticle Corona and Its Effects on Reactivityen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/colavitpen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid105811en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acssuschemeng.5b00304en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84936762814&partnerID=40&md5=ef092f364cf11b1b9d9e38cffd3a107ben
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0003-1008-2874en


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