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dc.contributor.authorBALSTERS, JOSHUAen
dc.contributor.authorGALLAGHER, LOUISEen
dc.contributor.authorMCGRATH, JANEen
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-01T10:59:22Z
dc.date.available2014-12-01T10:59:22Z
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.date.submitted2013en
dc.identifier.citationDelmonte S, Gallagher L, O'Hanlon E, McGrath J, Balsters JH, Functional and structural connectivity of frontostriatal circuitry in Autism Spectrum Disorder., Frontiers in human neuroscience, 7, 2013, 430en
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/72304
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractAbnormalities in frontostriatal circuitry potentially underlie the two core deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); social interaction and communication difficulties and restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Whilst a few studies have examined connectivity within this circuitry in ASD, no previous study has examined both functional and structural connectivity within the same population. The present study provides the first exploration of both functional and structural frontostriatal connectivity in ASD. Twenty-eight right-handed Caucasian male ASD (17.28 ± 3.57 years) and 27 right-handed male, age and IQ matched controls (17.15 ± 3.64 years) took part in the study. Resting state functional connectivity was carried out on 21 ASD and control participants, and tractography was carried out on 22 ASD and 24 control participants, after excluding subjects for excessive motion and poor data quality. Functional connectivity analysis was carried out between the frontal cortex and striatum after which tractography was performed between regions that showed significant group differences in functional connectivity. The ASD group showed increased functional connectivity between regions in the frontal cortex [anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), paracingulate gyrus (Pcg) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)], and striatum [nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and caudate]. Increased functional connectivity between ACC and caudate was associated with deactivation to social rewards in the caudate, as previously reported in the same participants. Greater connectivity between the right MFG and caudate was associated with higher restricted interests and repetitive behaviors and connectivity between the bilateral Pcg and NAcc, and the right OFC and NAcc, was negatively associated with social and communicative deficits. Although tracts were reliably constructed for each subject, there were no group differences in structural connectivity. Results are in keeping with previously reported increased corticostriatal functional connectivity in ASD.en
dc.format.extent430en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFrontiers in human neuroscienceen
dc.relation.ispartofseries7en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectstriatumen
dc.subjectsocial rewarden
dc.subjectfrontostriatalen
dc.subjectfMRIen
dc.subjectconnectivityen
dc.subjectDTIen
dc.subjectAutism Spectrum Disorderen
dc.titleFunctional and structural connectivity of frontostriatal circuitry in Autism Spectrum Disorder.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/balsterjen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/lgallaghen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/sandersjen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid88043en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00430en
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.subject.TCDThemeNeuroscienceen


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