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dc.contributor.authorTussing, Ad
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-23T14:44:38Z
dc.date.available2014-04-23T14:44:38Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.citationAd Tussing, 'Physician-induced demand for medical-care - irish general-practitioners', Economic and Social Research Institute, Economic and Social Review, Vol.14 (Issue 3), 1983, 1983, pp225-247
dc.identifier.issn0012-9984
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/68727
dc.description.abstractAbstract: In a cross-section study based on a national household sample survey, return visits with general practitioners (GPs) vary with the ratio of GPs to population. Thus, higher physician supply, which by itself would depress physician incomes, is compensated for by higher utilisation, in the form of increased return visits. Return visits also vary inversely with the regional ratio to population of low-income persons with free GP care. These results suggest that some demand for GP services is induced by the GPs themselves, for self-interested economic reasons. Similar studies have produced similar results in other countries with fee-for-service methods of remunerating physicians.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEconomic & Social Studies
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEconomic and Social Review
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVol.14 (Issue 3), 1983
dc.subjectEconomics
dc.subjectSociology
dc.titlePhysician-induced demand for medical-care - irish general-practitioners
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.publisher.placeDUBLIN
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsOpenAccess
dc.format.extentpaginationpp225-247


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